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Yankees acquire Aroldis Chapman and create the scariest bullpen on the planet

Former Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman smiles after closing out the ninth inning and recording a save against the Minnesota Twins. The New York Yankees acquired Chapman on Monday.
Former Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman smiles after closing out the ninth inning and recording a save against the Minnesota Twins. The New York Yankees acquired Chapman on Monday. (John Minchillo / Associated Press)

Leave it to the New York Yankees to go out and get a guy they don't really need who could quickly turn into somebody they don't want.

The Yankees acquired flame-throwing closer Aroldis Chapman from the Cincinnati Reds on Monday for four prospects and now they must decide where to put him. He joins closer Andrew Miller and dominant setup man Dellin Betances at the back end of a bullpen that now features the three top strikeout relievers in the major leagues.

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Chapman has averaged an amazing 15.4 strikeouts per nine innings since coming over from Cuba to join the Reds in 2010. The three of them combined have averaged 14.97 strikeouts per nine innings over the past three seasons.

Talk about strengthening your strength.

The Yankees already had the best one-two late-inning punch in the game and now they've got to find a way to keep three premier relievers happy next season.

It remains to be seen whether they immediately install Chapman as the closer, since he is the most accomplished save guy and the hardest-throwing pitcher in the game. He probably won't want it any other way with free agency looming next winter, but the case can be made that Miller and Betances have earned their roles and have been more efficient than Chapman the past two seasons.

There's also the domestic violence accusation in Davie, Fla., that apparently prompted the Los Angeles Dodgers to pull out of a deal for Chapman a few weeks ago. No charges have been filed, but the incident is still the subject of a criminal investigation and Chapman could face a suspension under Major League Baseball's new domestic violence policy.

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