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Suddenly, Blue Jays look like a Canadian club on the rocks

Toronto Blue Jays' Josh Donaldson rests after a collision during a force out at second base by Texas Rangers' Rougned Odor during the fourth inning of Game 1 of the American League Division Series in Toronto on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Texas won, 5-3.
Toronto Blue Jays' Josh Donaldson rests after a collision during a force out at second base by Texas Rangers' Rougned Odor during the fourth inning of Game 1 of the American League Division Series in Toronto on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. Texas won, 5-3. (Nathan Denette / Associated Press)

The American League Division Series between the Toronto Blue Jays and Texas Rangers was expected to be a star-studded affair, featuring some of the top hitters in the sport and a transplanted superstar starting pitcher on each side. But Game 1 ended with Blue Jays ace David Price still winless as a postseason starter and three major stars uncertain for Game 2 on Friday.

The Blue Jays lost third baseman -- and presumptive AL MVP -- Josh Donaldson after he took a knee to the head in a collision at second base, and Jose Bautista late in the game with a barking hamstring. The Rangers lost cornerstone third baseman Adrian Beltre to what appeared to be a significant back spasm.

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Of course, it's the Jays who are in true crisis, because they lost the opener of the best-of-five ALDS along with two-thirds of the heart of their batting order. Both Donaldson and Bautista probably will be back for Game 2. But even if they weren't questionable, the Jays just lost the first game of a short series at home with their top pitcher on the mound and now must beat Rangers ace Cole Hamels to head to Texas with a split at Rogers Centre.

Ouch!

So, what's up with Price? He now is 0-6 with a 5.23 ERA in six career postseason starts. That's quite a contrast to a regular-season resume that makes him one of baseball's most dependable pitchers. He was 18-5 with a 2.45 ERA during the regular season (9-1 after being dealt to the Jays) and figures to to win the AL Cy Young Award.

The same question could be asked about Los Angeles Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw, who has been the most dominant pitcher in baseball the past six years, but is 1-5 in the postseason with a 5.12 ERA and has lost his past four in fairly ugly fashion (7.15 ERA).

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