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Remembering 'Late Night' with Buck Showalter

With the much-anticipated final installment of the "Late Show with David Letterman" on Wednesday night, video resurfaced of then-Yankees manager Buck Showalter showing Letterman and one of his staff members the ropes at Yankee Stadium.

It's a funny bit that also includes longtime major league player and coach Frank Howard teaching Letterman how to take one for the team by peppering him with batting practice pitches. You can see it here.

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The video was from May 1992 when Letterman was still hosting "Late Night." But Showalter made his first appearance on Letterman during the spring of that year, doing a phone interview in which Letterman tried to steer him to say some of baseball's most common cliches.

"The first question was, 'Buck, when you are on the back fields and you're doing drills and stuff, what are you really working on ... what are you doing?'" Showalter recalled Wednesday. "I went, 'We're kind of working on fundamentals,' and I heard the audience laugh and I heard, 'Ding, ding, ding.'

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"So I'm putting two and two together that he's trying to see how many baseball cliches he can get me to say in like two minutes. I found out later there was like this big board [with the phrases]. And so the next question he asked me was, 'Buck, do you start thinking about all of spring training or three games in advance or how do you take each game?' And I knew it. So I said, 'David, I guess you want me to say, I take them one game at a time.' And I heard, 'Ding, ding, ding,' again and he cut off the interview, right there."

Showalter got some prime airtime back in his Yankees days. He appeared on Letterman at least twice and also starred in a famous "Seinfeld" episode in 1994, which featured him along with Yankees star Danny Tartabull.

In that episode, called "The Chaperone," George Costanza replaces the Yankees' polyester uniforms with cotton, which seemed like a good idea at the time but ultimately backfires.

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