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Marc Trestman would probably still be employed if Ravens had dependable offensive front

Ravens head coach John Harbaugh talks about firing Marc Trestman and replacing him with Marty Mornhinweg. (Lloyd Fox, Baltimore Sun video)

Let's be honest. There was no great injustice in the decision to fire Ravens offensive coordinator Marc Trestman. The offensive scheme was drab and obviously ineffective. The play calling was unimaginative. The running game and the passing game are supposed to dovetail and instead seemed to cancel each other out.

So, a new guy holding the play chart is going to be a good thing, but it's still fair to point out the obvious.

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Trestman would still be the offensive coordinator if the Ravens didn't have a revolving door on the left side of the O-line.

They had hoped that rookies Ronnie Stanley and Alex Lewis would step right in to protect Joe Flacco, and instead have been banged up and unavailable for significant periods over the first five weeks of the season.

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Everyone knew there was risk in opening the season with two rookies on the blind side, and the Ravens quickly found themselves struggling to find the right combination to protect Flacco and open up the run game.

Sunday's ugly 10-point performance was the breaking point for Trestman, but there had been whispers for at least a couple of weeks that he was in danger of being replaced.

The Ravens opened up against the Washington Redskins with a solid and productive running attack, though the rushing numbers were juiced by a couple of breakaway runs by Terrance West. When Trestman seemed to abandon the rush in the second half, it was easy to look back and second-guess that approach after the Ravens were shut out for those two quarters.

It certainly didn't reflect well on him that every meaningful yard the Ravens gained in the game came in the first quarter. They scored their final points of the game with a Justin Tucker field goal on the first play of the second quarter, then came out passing in each of their remaining possessions of the first half.

Would they have won the game if they had stuck with the run? Who knows?

Would it have made any difference over the long run? Probably not.

Everyone could see that the design of the offense included too many short pass plays that ended drives even when they were completed. That's a sign that the O-line wasn't cutting it and that did not change when Trestman was fired.

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