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The Big Ten made the right move. You can still question how it made its decision. | COMMENTARY

It was inevitable that one of the major conferences postponed the 2020 football season because of the coronavirus pandemic. The Big Ten finally decided to do so Tuesday, and will try to start up again in the spring.

College football is in the same situation as education. We live in a litigious society, and college presidents likely couldn’t bear the potential of several lawsuits from players who might contract COVID-19 and suffer complications. So, they shut it down, just like several schools that have closed their doors throughout the country. Other sports affected by the Big Ten’s decision include men’s and women’s’ cross country, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer and women’s volleyball.

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I would like to think the decision was made solely concerning player safety, but that’s not the case.

However, I don’t have a problem with the Big Ten’s decision and hope several of the other top conferences make a similar choice. In fact, the Pac-12 decided less than an hour after the Big Ten’s announcement to postpone all sports until 2021.

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Every day there seems to be more questions and concerns about this virus, its effects on various organs and how it affects children and young adults. Recent statistics in the United States — 40,171 new cases and 432 newly confirmed deaths as of Tuesday — show that the virus is not yet under control.

It’s ironic, and almost humorous at times, to hear college coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban and Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh lobby for their conferences to play this season.

They’ll talk about how their institutions have it under control, but what about hotbed states such as Texas, Florida and Arizona? Saban suggested that players have a higher risk of getting the virus on campus than on the football field. I have no problems shutting down campuses right now, either.

Ironically, we didn’t hear much from Saban or Harbaugh when Division II and Division III schools had their seasons canceled earlier.

I keep hearing this argument about how bad the cancellations will be for football players because they will have more time on their hands and need structure. So, is this preschool or college? Whatever happened to real-life situations and teaching life lessons?

This is a great time to sit the players down and teach them how to deal with reality. Regardless of how hard you work or how much time you put in, things don’t always go as planned. Despite the frustrations and setbacks in life, we have to adjust and move on. Sorry to say, life isn’t always fair.

Some of this fallout could have been avoided, but we haven’t gotten strong leadership from the current administration in Washington. Now, the sport that is really our national pastime is starting to take a hiatus.

It will be a sad fall and winter if the other major conferences join the Big Ten and Pac-12. Big Ten universities will take a lot of criticism for their decision, but it was the right one. Playing games should not take precedence over human life.

Even if potential litigation was a likely major factor in the decision.

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