xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Jack Schofield, Hall of Fame lacrosse player at St. Mary’s and University of Maryland, dies at age 76

Jack Schofield, seen in this file photo as a goalkeeper at the University of Maryland, died Oct. 15 at the age of 76.
Jack Schofield, seen in this file photo as a goalkeeper at the University of Maryland, died Oct. 15 at the age of 76. (HANDOUT)

John “Jack” T. Schofield Jr. was a member of several halls of fame for his accomplishments as a lacrosse player.

To his only son, Schofield was a Hall of Fame father.

Advertisement

John Schofield III was only 8 years old when a family tragedy caused his parents to divorce.

Jack Schofield did not blink an eye and vowed to raise the youngster as a single parent.

Advertisement

“My dad took a very bad situation and made the best of it,” John Schofield III said. “It was a tough time, but he took charge and said we would do whatever it took to get through this.”

It was the 1980s and the younger Schofield would soon realize single fathers were not commonplace at the time. Jack Schofield did everything possible to make sure his son had a stable upbringing despite having a mother absent from his life.

“The two of us went through a lot when we were younger. We saw a lot of death and some terrible things, but dad kept us afloat and we made it through the tough times,” John Schofield III said. “Jack never let me whine or complain. He instructed me that a lot of people out there have it worse.”

John “Jack” T. Schofield Jr. died Oct. 15 in Annapolis after a years-long battle with declining health and dementia. The Annapolis native was two weeks shy of his 77th birthday.

Schofield was inducted into the St. Mary’s High Athletic Hall of Fame (1997), the Anne Arundel County Sports Hall of Fame (1993) and the Chesapeake Chapter of U.S. Lacrosse Hall of Fame (2019) for his prowess as a goaltender in high school and at University of Maryland.

Pictured, from left, Chesapeake Chapter president Terry Edmondson, Kate Graw Lamond (Severn, Dartmouth), Andrea Holthaus Whiteford (Spalding, Loyola), Jack Schofield (St. Mary's, Maryland), Charley Toomey (Arnold native, Loyola), Josh Sims (Severn, Princeton), Megan Riley Clark (South River, James Madison), Eddie Trujillo, Chesapeake Chapter Board of Directors and chairman of the Hall of Fame committee. - Original Credit:
Pictured, from left, Chesapeake Chapter president Terry Edmondson, Kate Graw Lamond (Severn, Dartmouth), Andrea Holthaus Whiteford (Spalding, Loyola), Jack Schofield (St. Mary's, Maryland), Charley Toomey (Arnold native, Loyola), Josh Sims (Severn, Princeton), Megan Riley Clark (South River, James Madison), Eddie Trujillo, Chesapeake Chapter Board of Directors and chairman of the Hall of Fame committee. - Original Credit: (Courtesy Photo / HANDOUT)

Born Oct. 27, 1943 and always affectionately known as Jack or Jackie, he was the son and namesake of John T. Schofield Sr., a civil engineer at the Naval Academy. His mother, Mary, was a secretary for football assistant Steve Belichick, the father of New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick. The family initially lived on Market Street before moving to Eastport.

Jack was a standout athlete from a young age, playing football for the Annapolis Athletic Association with the likes of Alan Pastrana, Tommy Swontek, Eddie Basil, George Samaras, Bobby Fowler and Tommy Kallis.

Schofield also starred in Little League baseball alongside Gerald Winegrad, Dickie Bruther and others. Winegrad first met Schofield at St. Mary’s Elementary and remembers he was a scrappy catcher in baseball. St. Mary’s High did not have a baseball program in those days, and Schofield considered transferring to Annapolis High to play his favorite sport.

Instead, Schofield stayed at St. Mary’s and became a three-sport standout — learning lacrosse as his spring outlet. Schofield was an accomplished quarterback in football and three-year starter in basketball, but his passion became lacrosse.

“Jackie had a very strong competitive spirit and was a very aggressive athlete with a confident attitude,” Winegrad said.

Upon graduating in 1961, Schofield earned a lacrosse scholarship to the University of Maryland and became a two-time All-American. He was a first-team All-American goalie as a senior in 1965 after leading all of Division I with 190 saves. The left-hander stopped 154 shots in earning honorable mention honors as a junior.

Many years later, Schofield would admit he almost quit playing lacrosse as a freshman at Maryland after realizing the caliber of competition was so strong.

Advertisement

“My first few practices with the varsity, I couldn’t stop a darn shot. I got peppered by great players like Buddy Beardmore and John Kenworthy, and I swear I didn’t make a single save,” Schofield told The Capital in 2007.

Assistant coach John “Hezzy” Howard helped fix a few fundamental flaws in Schofield’s style while legendary head coach Jack Faber built the youngster’s confidence by telling Beardmore and Kenworthy to shoot the ball directly into the stick of the young netminder.

“Jack was a very good all-around athlete, so he could come out of the cage to get ground balls or help with the clearing game,” said Fred Betz, a midfielder who was a three-year teammate and roommate of Schofield’s at Maryland.

“Jack had excellent hand-eye coordination, so he was very adept at stopping the ball and was also a tremendous passer. He could hit me at midfield with a long bomb of a clearing pass every time.”

As a senior captain, Schofield received the prestigious C. Markland Kelly Award as the nation’s finest goaltender. He was selected to play in the 1965 North-South Collegiate All-Star game.

Schofield was presented with the Charles P. McCormick Award, given annually to the Maryland athlete from the greater Baltimore area judged to have contributed most to the school during their senior year. He also earned the Powell Award as Most Valuable Player for Maryland lacrosse.

Schofield was an assistant coach at Air Force and Army on opposite ends of a distinguished 11-year military career. He was commissioned as an officer in the Air Force in 1966 after completing the Reserve Officer Training Corps program while at Maryland.

Schofield served as an intelligence officer deployed to Vietnam and received the Bronze Star for his actions in that theater.

The elder Schofield had dreamed of attending the United States Military Academy but did not because of a snafu with his congressional appointment. John Schofield III would attend West Point for one semester before transferring to Villanova, where he went through the ROTC.

John Schofield III reconnected the family with Annapolis in 2000 when he was stationed at the Naval Academy as a lieutenant teaching navigation. Commander Schofield returned to the yard in 2013 as public affairs officer for the Naval Academy.

“I can say unequivocally that my career as a Naval Officer was directly and constantly informed by the influence of my father," the younger Schofield said. "He imbued upon me a desire for service above self, and his teachings to me as an athlete had direct correlation to the tools I needed to lead sailors in the fleet.”

Jack Schofield retired from military service in 1975 and went to work for Johnson & Johnson — enjoying a successful 17-year career as a pharmaceutical executive with the company. After retiring in 1992, he lived in Park City, Utah, Destin, Florida, and Tucson, Arizona, before returning home to Annapolis to be closer to his son and family.

John Schofield III described his father as “a larger-than-life personality” who would practice his standard one-liners and self-deprecating Irish humor on the waitresses of Rams Head, Armadillos and Carpaccio Tuscan Grille.

Jack Schofield adopted two daughters — Holly and Kathy — from his marriage to Ann Ullman of Washington, D.C. Holly died in an automobile accident while away at college in 1982, while Kathy Carpenter currently lives in Winter Park, Colorado.

In addition to his son, daughter-in-law Susan and stepdaughter, Jack Schofield is survived by five grandchildren — Colin, William and Carter Schofield along with Christopher and Quincy Carpenter.

Preceded in death by two sisters (Nancy and Marilyn), Jack was the beloved uncle to 12 nieces and nephews.

Advertisement

A celebration of Jack Schofield’s life will be held Sunday, Oct. 25 at 4-5:30 p.m. at Carpaccio Tuscan Grille in Annapolis. It will take place in the outdoor courtyard area and give friends and family an opportunity to raise a glass in his honor in a safe, socially distanced manner.

Advertisement

The Schofield family would like to thank Sunrise Senior Living, Brightview South River Assisted Living and Anne Arundel Medical Center for their care and compassion in the last two years of Jack’s life. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Hospice of the Chesapeake at hospicechesapeake.org/giving/donate-now/

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement