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Going back in time at Glyndon Station Park

Along with my passion for the outdoors and all that our natural surroundings have to offer, I also have a love of history. When both of these worlds collide, I am in heaven. Living in Reisterstown and commuting to the city, I have spent many mornings driving through the historic town of Glyndon. I couldn't help but fawn over the gorgeous Victorian homes and tree-lined streets. However, it wasn't until my son and I decided to walk on a Saturday morning to the Glyndon post office to mail a parcel that I began to learn the historical significance of this small town.

We took our usual route down Worthington Avenue, but this time, instead of taking a right at Chatsworth Avenue, we decided to venture down the path just before Chatsworth and head behind the post office to the railroad tracks. We walked down the gravel road behind the Glyndon Post Office. An article in the Baltimore Sun explains that in 2000, a group of Glyndon residents got together to buy and then lease back the brick post office to the U.S. Postal Service so it wouldn't face development.

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Glyndon, after the railroad arrived, became a popular area for affluent Baltimore residents to build their Victorian summer houses. Being only 25 minutes by railroad from the city, businessmen could to go to and from the city for their jobs in the warm months. I could just stop and imagine all of the people of the city traveling out of the country on the Western Maryland Railroad line, looking to enjoy the wide open spaces and small town charm of Glyndon. According to historicalglyndon.org, a small business district surrounded the train station, including a blacksmith shop, a wheelwright shop, a butcher, a bakery and a post office that still stands in Glyndon today.

After exploring the revived railroad station, we walked further down Railroad Avenue to explore Glyndon. As we traveled down the road, we passed an old fire pump with a concrete sign in front with the letters G.V.F.Co. etched into it. Further down the street we discovered a lovely park with a sign in front reading Glyndon Station Park under an image of an old steam engine. We couldn't believe we had been Reisterstown residents for years and had no idea this hidden gem existed. The park has an old fashioned-looking black metal fence along the front, opening to a peaceful grassy area that houses picnic areas, mature trees, a playground, a gazebo and a walking path.

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The gazebo is a large white structure with antique-looking rod iron benches underneath to provide a break for the sun in the warm months. It also is a great place to sit and watch your children play on the well maintained playground. There are several swings, rocking toys, and a large train-shaped play structure for the little ones — very fitting for the area. Behind the playground is an open grassy area where you could kick around a soccer ball or lay down a blanket for a picnic. At the rear of the park are several rod iron and wooden tables and chairs that mimic the historical nature of the area. I couldn't help but think that with the several eateries within walking vicinity, this would be a great place to enjoy a sandwich or cool drink.

Back near the entrance to the park is a water fountain and a brick structure with a bell sitting on the top. On the brick there is a sign reading "Bronze Cast Iron Mold. Howard Locomotive #1020. 1880-1932. Steam Operated." My son could not believe that the bell was from a steam engine from 1880. The bell is such a nice touch for the park.

Since the day we ventured into historic Glyndon, we have been back to visit Glyndon Station Park several times. My favorite spot to sit and watch my son enjoying nature is the round bench surrounding the tall tree in the middle of the park. Who knew there was so much history only a short walk from our Reisterstown home?

Kelly Scible is a Reisterstown resident and can be reached at kellyscible@gmail.com.

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