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In Baltimore’s District 4, crowded field hopes to replace City Councilman Bill Henry

Nicole E. Harris-Crest, Mark Conway and Logan Endow have emerged as notable candidates in the crowded Baltimore City Council District 4 campaign to succeed Councilman Bill Henry, who is running for comptroller after more than a decade in the seat.

Harris-Crest, a Democrat who is a top official in the Baltimore state’s attorney’s office, leads the pack with $37,000 in her campaign account as of the April filing deadline. She is the daughter of the late City Councilman Kenneth Harris, who was killed in a robbery in 2008.

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Henry, who was elected in 2007, is not endorsing a candidate.

With her father’s legacy inspiring her run, Harris-Crest said her experience in nonprofits and the private sector will help make her an effective and successful representative for the district, which spans North and Northeast Baltimore.

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“I’m a city resident who’s frustrated with the current state of our city,” she said. “I have the experience and the background to help us move forward.”

Logan Endow, a Democrat who works in the Baltimore City Public Schools’ Re-Engagement Center, which helps students re-enroll after dropping out, has nearly $19,000 on hand, according to his April campaign finance report. Endow also has studied gun violence and public health.

He said he knocked on 10,000 doors before the coronavirus restrictions limited campaigning and is the only candidate who is not accepting contributions from corporate special interests such as liquor stores, lobbyists or developers.

“I led the Ebola response in Liberia’s most violent city, and my education at Stanford and London School of Economics focused on gun violence prevention," Endow said. "I’m running for City Council to help reverse Baltimore’s COVID and violence epidemics.”

Mark Conway, a Democrat who runs a nonprofit organization focused on creating a greener Baltimore, had more than $21,500 in his campaign account as of January. He spent more than half of those funds on salaries, media buys, campaign materials and other expenses, leaving him with less than $7,000 on hand, according to his April 28 campaign finance report. (That report, which lists only $250 in contributions since January, is incomplete, Conway said, adding he has nearly $14,000 on hand.)

Conway, a former deputy director of the Mayor’s Office of CitiStat, said the coronavirus has “completely changed” his campaign strategy, but he remains driven by his frustration with Baltimore’s lack of progress both recently and historically.

“I love my city and I want to see us get back on the right path," he said. "There are no candidates in the race that have the breadth of experience that I bring. ... Hopefully the council will have that opportunity.”

There are seven other candidates who have filed to run in the Democratic primary, include civil rights attorney Anson Asaka and Democratic Central Committee leader Angie Winder.

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