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A bill passed the U.S. Senate unanimously Tuesday to allow women who flew domestic missions during World War II to be inurned at Arlington National Cemetery.

More than 1,000 women — including 14 Marylanders — flew noncombat military missions for the Women Airforce Service Pilots during the war. The WASPs delivered war planes, ferried cargo and towed targets for other pilots.

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"If they were good enough to fly for our country, risk their lives and earn the Congressional Gold Medal, they should be good enough to be laid to rest at Arlington," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski in a statement. She has introduced legislation to reinstate the inurnments.

The women and their descendants have struggled for recognition. The group was not granted veterans status until 1977. And though the superintendent of Arlington National Cemetery allowed the women to be interred there, the secretary of the Army reversed the decision in March 2015.

The bill now returns to the House of Representatives for approval. If granted, it will head for the president's desk.

Baltimore Sun reporter John Fritze contributed to this article.

An earlier version misstated when the Army reversed its decision. The Sun regrets the error.

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