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The government shutdown, by the numbers

Workers at BWI hold a rally protesting their wages and calling for an end to the government shutdown. (Barbara Haddock Taylor, Baltimore Sun video)

The longest government shutdown in U.S. history technically ended Friday, though federal workers were still waiting this weekend for their bank accounts to reflect that fact.

To take stock of the impact, here’s a look at some key numbers:

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800,000: Federal workers who were furloughed or working without pay.

172,000: Marylanders that State Comptroller Peter Franchot’s office estimated the shutdown affected, including federal employees and contractors who weren't being paid.

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Marylanders expressed relief at the end of a partial federal government shutdown, but also frustration that it lasted a record 35 days — and anxiety that it could happen again next month. Lila Johnson, a contract custodian at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was awaiting word on when to report.

4,109: Marylanders who had been seeking shutdown-related unemployment insurance benefits on Thursday, the day before Trump announced it was ending.

53: Percent of people who blamed President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans for the shutdown in a Washington Post-ABC News poll.

35: Days the shutdown lasted.

If you were watching cable news and started feeling by late afternoon as if you were pinballing through some kind of drug-induced nightmare, you are not alone. I had to walk away from the TV for some cold, fresh air by the time Trump was halfway through his I-am-not-caving-on-the-shutdown speech.

34: Percent of people who blamed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other congressional Democrats for the shutdown in the Post-ABC poll.

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15: Locations the state collected food donations for employees of the federal government, under its #MDHelps program.

3: Weeks for which the government has funding to remain open to negotiate a longer-term deal. (Another shutdown in February? That’s the new fear for many federal workers.)

2: The apparent age of those responsible for the shutdown, according to Gov. Larry Hogan. “It’s crazy,” Hogan said. “It’s like, ‘If I don’t get my wall, I’m going to shut down the government.’ ‘If we don’t open the government you can’t speak in our chamber.’ It’s a bunch of 2-year-olds.”

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