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Elections

Five highlights from primary election night in Maryland

Maryland’s action-packed primary day ended Tuesday with nominees in some races and left many others too close to call as nearly every consequential state and local race was on the ballot.

Here’s a rundown of what you might have missed.

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Governor

Del. Dan Cox, a far-right conservative Republican endorsed by former President Donald Trump, made headlines around the country as he defeated Gov. Larry Hogan’s hand-picked successor, former state Commerce Secretary Kelly Schulz.

Polls in recent months had shown a neck-and-neck race even as Schulz out-fundraised and outspent Cox the entire way.

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Though some predicted the race wouldn’t be settled for days as mail-in ballots await to be counted, The Associated Press called it for Cox slightly after 11 p.m. By midnight, Cox held a nearly 36,000-vote lead as at least 38,300 mail-in ballots — a number that would likely increase — were left to be counted starting 10 a.m. Thursday.

The Democratic side was too close call by early Wednesday, though former nonprofit leader Wes Moore led the crowded nine-person field with about 37% of the vote, followed by former U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez at 27% and state Comptroller Peter Franchot at 20%.

About 169,000 mail-in ballots had been returned by Tuesday, and Perez and Franchot were hoping those could make up the difference for their campaigns.

Comptroller

In continuing to disrupt the predicted trend that Maryland’s primary races would be too close to call, The Associated Press named Baltimore Del. Brooke E. Lierman the presumptive Democratic nominee for comptroller.

Lierman, who is finishing up her second term in the Maryland House of Delegates as a representative of South Baltimore, downtown and the Inner Harbor, earned 64% of early and primary day votes, sweeping Bowie Mayor Timothy J. Adams.

She will face off against Republican Harford County Executive Barry Glassman in the November general election.

Attorney general

Congressman Anthony Brown was declared the victor over former Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Katie Curran O’Malley in the race to be the Democratic nominee for Maryland attorney general.

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Brown served as lieutenant governor for O’Malley’s husband, former Gov. Martin O’Malley, during his second term. The pair went head-to-head in a battle to replace Attorney General Brian E. Frosh, who decided last year not to run for a third term.

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By the end of Tuesday night, Brown had received nearly 10,000 more votes than O’Malley in Baltimore City, her home base. If he defeats the yet-to-be-determined Republican nominee in November, he would be the first Black person directly elected to statewide office.

State’s attorney in Baltimore and Baltimore County

Defense attorney Ivan Bates held a sizable lead in the three-way state’s attorney race in Baltimore City, where incumbent Marilyn Mosby said she would “fight … until every single vote is counted.”

At least 20,000 mail-in ballots remained uncounted as Bates led with 41% to Mosby’s 32% and former prosecutor Thiru Vignarajah’s 27%.

In Baltimore County, an extremely narrow margin left the race between State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger and challenger Robbie Leonard up in the air. On the Republican side, James A. Haynes was leading Deborah Hill.

Congressional races

Heather Mizeur, a former Montgomery County delegate and 2014 gubernatorial candidate, was declared the District 1 Democratic nominee Tuesday night, and will take on Congressman Andy Harris, the state’s sole Republican House representative, in November.

Mizeur bested former Foreign Service officer Dave Harden in the race to square up against Harris, who met with former President Donald Trump to discuss disrupting President Joe Biden’s 2020 election victory.


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