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Maryland GOP uses impeachment as fundraising tactic

President Donald Trump participates in a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Wednesday.
President Donald Trump participates in a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Wednesday. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Maryland’s Republican Party is using the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump for a fundraising drive.

“Impeach? NO WAY!” reads the subject line of an email fundraising solicitation the party sent out on Friday afternoon.

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It continues, saying that “Democrat Obstruction Has Gone Far Enough!”

The email says that Democrats have “lied, panicked the public, sued in the courts, and used their media allies to spread fake news!” It goes on to accuse House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi of calling for the impeachment of the president “because her radical left base is foaming at the mouth, demanding it.”

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Republicans are encouraged to donate to the “MDGOP Impeachment Defense Fund,” which appears to be designed to pay for outreach and advertising to promote an anti-impeachment message.

Donors are offered the option of contributing as little as $5, which would reach 125 voters, up to $100 to reach 2,500 voters.

Using impeachment as a fundraising tactic has worked for Trump himself, who raised $13 million for his campaign this week, according to the Associated Press.

A Trump fundraising text called the impeachment a “WITCH HUNT!” and said: “I need you on my Impeachment Defense Team.”

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Democrats have used impeachment in their solicitations, too.

Hours after Pelosi announced on Tuesday that she would launch a formal impeachment inquiry, Democratic presidential candidate John Delaney, a former Maryland congressman, used the specter of impeachment in an email blast to supporters.

“With the news rapidly unfolding, we need to know where our supporters stand at this critical moment of time,” Delaney’s email read.

The email included a link to a faux poll that asked respondents to provide their name, email address and ZIP code — a tool for the campaign to develop a list of supporters who care about impeachment.

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