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Baltimore’s information technology office lost dozens of time sheet records from 311 call center employees in the May ransomware attack, according to a city audit released Wednesday. In this file photo, a sign on the door of the Department of Public Works' water department office is posted after the attack.
Baltimore’s information technology office lost dozens of time sheet records from 311 call center employees in the May ransomware attack, according to a city audit released Wednesday. In this file photo, a sign on the door of the Department of Public Works' water department office is posted after the attack. (Kenneth K. Lam / The Baltimore Sun)

Baltimore’s information technology office lost dozens of time sheet records from 311 call center employees in the May ransomware attack, according to a city audit released Wednesday.

Auditors weren’t able to ensure payroll time sheets were accurately recorded because they couldn’t access the servers that stored many of them, the report states. The IT office didn’t back up the server that held the records before the attack. Losing the ability to audit these records, the report states, “may result in financial losses, including inaccurate payments, accruals and final payouts to agency employees.”

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The IT office in November announced backup plans for its servers and plans to develop a new record retention plan by March, according to the office’s audit response.

During the attack, hackers gained access to city systems, encrypted files using ransomware and demanded payment for the decryption keys, which Democratic Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young refused to pay. The ransomware disrupted employees’ email service, halted water billing, suspended real estate transactions and cost the city millions.

The city first acknowledged in September that it had lost some data.

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