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Hogan visits Maryland National Guard soldiers defending U.S. Capitol ahead of inauguration

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks with Brigadier General Janeen Birckhead, commander of all National Guard units in D.C., during a visit with the Maryland units called up to help defend the U.S. Capitol for the President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks with Brigadier General Janeen Birckhead, commander of all National Guard units in D.C., during a visit with the Maryland units called up to help defend the U.S. Capitol for the President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday. (Handout/For The Baltimore Sun)

Gov. Larry Hogan traveled to Washington, D.C., Monday and received a security briefing from soldiers of the Maryland National Guard deployed to defend the U.S. Capitol.

Hogan sent the soldiers and state troopers to the Capitol after supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the grounds Jan 6., bashing in windows, breaking in doors, entering the building and beating police officers. The governor sent 500 soldiers and 200 state troopers, his office said.

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President-elect Joe Biden is to be inaugurated Wednesday, and law enforcement officials has expressed concern about the possibility of more political violence.

“The State of Maryland will do everything we can to protect the transition of power, and we continue to work closely with allied law enforcement and federal partners to support the inauguration,” Hogan said in a statement Monday. “I am looking forward to attending the ceremonies on Wednesday to represent the people of Maryland.”

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His office released photos of the governor touring the grounds Monday and meeting with the soldiers.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency denied requests by Maryland and Virginia seeking a federal disaster declaration to help pay for the Guard’s deployment to Washington.

Hogan spokesman Mike Ricci said the state will appeal FEMA’s decision.

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