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Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott, city officials participate in Mondawmin neighborhood walk following fatal shooting

At least 50 people turned out for a community walk Thursday evening with local Baltimore officials in the Mondawmin neighborhood.

The walk was led by Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott who was joined by Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison, Deputy Mayor of Public Safety Sunny Schnitzer, Democratic Sen. Antonio Hayes, who represents parts of West Baltimore and city councilman James Torrence (D-District 7), and Antonio Glover (D-District 13).

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Mayor Brandon Scott speaks with Karrine Redmond, 12, and Millie Brown, founder of Tears of a Mother's Cry, near Mondawmin Mall. Scott and city staff walked more than two miles around neighborhoods adjoining Mondawmin Mall, speaking with residents in response to recent violence.
Mayor Brandon Scott speaks with Karrine Redmond, 12, and Millie Brown, founder of Tears of a Mother's Cry, near Mondawmin Mall. Scott and city staff walked more than two miles around neighborhoods adjoining Mondawmin Mall, speaking with residents in response to recent violence. (Amy Davis)

Though community walks are something Scott often does (one was held Wednesday in Northwest Baltimore), the Democrat said he felt it was important to talk with residents in the Mondawmin area following Monday’s shooting outside a Dunkin Donuts that left one man dead.

“This is about showing up and being present and getting people the services they need,” Scott said.

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Throughout the 2.5 mile walk in the neighborhood, residents stopped the mayor to share their concerns about drainage around homes, branches that needed trimming, illegal dumping and crime.

With members of various city agencies present, including the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement, the Department of Public Works and homeless services, areas of focus were able to be pointed out in real time.

The police commissioner said the walks certainly aren’t meant to solve crimes but instead meet people on their level and explore the community from their eyes.

“This is an opportunity to see what they see and show them that we understand their plight,” he said.

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No arrests have been made in the Mondawmin shooting and the commissioner said it is an “ongoing investigation.”

Linda Batts, the vice president of the Hanlon Improvement Association, said she came out to the walk because she wanted to see greater accountability from officials and less rhetoric.

“Black neighborhoods matter,” she said. “And they don’t just matter when somebody is shot. I want to see change in my lifetime when I’m able to actually see it.”

Mary Hughes, an executive board member of the Panway Neighborhood Improvement Association, said she was encouraged to see the mayor and other officials out in the neighborhoods. But, she said it felt like they only show up after the fact.

“I’m really frustrated with our leadership,” she said. “I feel like they are disrespecting our Black communities.”

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