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Maryland regulators are allowing medical cannabis dispensaries to resume sales of vaping products. Sales had been halted for a week while products were tested for vitamin E acetate, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says is linked to some vaping-related lung injuries. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)
Maryland regulators are allowing medical cannabis dispensaries to resume sales of vaping products. Sales had been halted for a week while products were tested for vitamin E acetate, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says is linked to some vaping-related lung injuries. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink) (Hans Pennink / AP)

Maryland regulators are allowing medical cannabis dispensaries to resume selling vaping products, after testing products for vitamin E acetate, which may be linked to vaping-related lung injuries.

“We’re pleased to announce that no vitamin E acetate was found in any of the medical cannabis vape products available at our licensed dispensaries,” Will Tilburg, acting director of the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, said in a statement Friday.

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The cannabis commission ordered dispensaries to stop selling vaping products on Nov. 15, after federal officials linked vitamin E acetate to more than two dozen injuries and illnesses associated with vaping.

The cannabis commission required cannabis vaping products to be tested for vitamin E acetate. When the testing all came back negative, regulators lifted the ban on cannabis vape sales on Friday.

Nationally, more than 2,000 people — including 51 in Maryland — have been sickened with illness or injuries believed to be associated with vaping or e-cigarette use. E-cigarettes and vaping products can be used to deliver nicotine or cannabis to users.

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