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Hogan names new leaders for Baltimore port and Maryland highways

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan named new leaders for Baltimore’s port and the state’s highway system on Tuesday.

William P. Doyle will take over as executive director of the Maryland Port Administration on July 22.

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Doyle was the CEO of the Dredging Contractors of America. Before that, he was a federal maritime commissioner from 2013 through 2018, and was involved in international labor and maritime negotiations, according to the Hogan administration.

He holds a marine engineering degree from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and a law degree from Widener University.

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Doyle replaces James J. White, who resigned at the end of 2019 after leading the administration for 18 years. White is credited with overseeing record growth at the port, including a 2017 expansion — the first such expansion in three decades.

Doyle’s salary was not immediately disclosed, but his predecessor White had a salary of $327,000 last year, according to state salary records.

The Maryland State Highway Administration’s new leader will be Tim Smith, who has been serving as acting administrator since Greg Slater, the previous administrator, became state transportation secretary last December.

Smith is a longtime SHA employee who has held leadership roles, including serving as district engineer for Anne Arundel, Charles, Calvert and St. Mary’s counties. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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The State Highway Administration maintains 17,000 lane miles of roads and 2,500 bridges.

Smith’s salary as administrator also was not disclosed. Slater’s base salary as SHA administrator was $182,000, according to state salary records.

Hogan also named a new chief administrative judge, Chung Ki Pak, who previously was an administrative patent judge for the federal government and who holds a law degree from the Catholic University of America. The state has more than 50 administrative judges who handle matters such as appeals of state agency decisions.

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