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“At a time when equality and justice are at risk in our country, we need a courageous civil rights leader as governor who will protect Maryland from the worst of Donald Trump's dangerous agenda,” Eric Holder said in a statement.
“At a time when equality and justice are at risk in our country, we need a courageous civil rights leader as governor who will protect Maryland from the worst of Donald Trump's dangerous agenda,” Eric Holder said in a statement. (Andrew Harnik / AP 2015)

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday endorsed Democrat Ben Jealous for Maryland governor — the latest in a series of high-profile Democrats backing the former NAACP president in his underdog campaign against Republican Gov. Larry Hogan.

Holder, who served under President Barack Obama, touted Jealous' commitment to reforming Maryland's criminal justice system and improving public safety as top reasons to back his bid for governor.

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“At a time when equality and justice are at risk in our country, we need a courageous civil rights leader as governor who will protect Maryland from the worst of Donald Trump's dangerous agenda,” Holder said in a statement.

Jealous said he and Holder “share a vision where Maryland moves to a smart on crime approach to expanding opportunity and making our communities safer.”

Jealous also has received endorsements from national figures such as Senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders and Cory Booker, and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Meanwhile, the Hogan campaign announced endorsements of his own.

Three Laborers’ International Union of North America local unions — subsidiaries of the parent labor organization that backs the governor — endorsed Hogan.

LIUNA counts 40,000 members in Mid-Atlantic region which includes Maryland.

“Governor Hogan has been a great friend not just to LIUNA members, but to working men and women across Maryland,” Dennis Desmond, Business Manager of LIUNA Local 11 said in a statement.

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