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Maryland Republican Gov. Hogan highlights 'bipartisanship' in second campaign ad

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan highlighted his ability to work with Democrats and said he's "fed up" with politics during his second television ad of the primary season.

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan will launch his second television ad of the primary season on Wednesday, declaring himself “completely fed up with politics as usual” during a 30-second spot designed to highlight his ability to work with Maryland Democrats.

The popular incumbent faces no GOP primary challenger, but the crowded field of Democrats jockeying to challenge him in November have been taking jabs at his tenure. Hogan has launched a $1.3 million effort to protect his record on the airwaves.

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Hogan’s new ad, called “The Aisle,” features footage of Hogan smiling and back-slapping with the Democratic presiding officers of the General Assembly, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, and posing with Baltimore’s Democratic Mayor Catherine Pugh.

Popular Republican Gov. Larry Hogan launched his 2018 reelection campaign with a rally in Annapolis Saturday, telling supporters that if his job approval rating is so high among Maryland residents voters should give him a second term.

“We don’t always agree, but we respectfully agree to disagree, and we’re honest with each other,” Hogan says in the ad, which also features headlines from several local media outlets using the word “bipartisan.”

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Hogan has demonstrated significant cross-party appeal, according to recent polls. In a Baltimore Sun-University of Baltimore poll released this week, about a quarter of Democrats said they planned to vote for him in the fall. Sixty percent of Democrats approved of the job he was doing.

Kathleen Matthews, chair of the Maryland Democratic Party, said this week that Democrats don’t fully understand the governor’s record. She pointed to several examples where Hogan embraced a Democratic policy idea only after it was clear the Democrat-dominated General Assembly was going to pass it anyway — free community college, a fracking ban and paid sick leave among them.

Hogan, meanwhile, has amassed more money than the entire field of nine Democratic candidates combined.

The primary election will be held on June 26, and early voting begins on Thursday.

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