Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., reacts at her Democratic primary election night victory rally in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008.
Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., reacts at her Democratic primary election night victory rally in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008. (Elise Amendola / Associated Press)

Former Secretary of State and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will speak at a fundraiser in Baltimore next month for a program that pays for students to travel to Israel -- marking the Democrat's first public appearance in the state since last year's primary election.

Clinton will speak at an event for the Elijah Cummings Youth Program, a 19-year-old collaboration between the Democratic congressman and the Baltimore Jewish Council that pays for a dozen high school juniors in Cummings' congressional district to learn about and study in the country every year.

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Clinton last spoke in Baltimore on April 10, 2016, days before Maryland's Democratic presidential primary. She beat Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders by a nearly two-to-one margin in that election, and performed similarly well against President Donald Trump in the state in November.

Cummings and the Jewish Council created the program in 1998. The congressman not only meets with students who participate but also donates honorarium he receives for speeches to the group. The students involved, most of whom are African American, learn about Israel during their junior year and then travel to the country for three-and-a-half weeks the following summer.

"One of the major goals is to build a strong relationship between the African American and Jewish communities," said Howard Libit, the executive director of the Baltimore Jewish Council.

The fundraiser will take place on June 5 at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park in Fells Point. Tickets start at $125.

Clinton has kept a relatively low profile since losing the election last year, though she emerged this month at an event in New York and said she would be "part of the resistance" to Trump and blamed her surprise loss in part on Russian interference and former FBI director James B. Comey.

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