Gov. Larry Hogan and Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young are set to meet to discuss ways the state can help the city’s leaders fight crime, as the number of killings in the city so far this year has eclipsed the figure tallied in all of 2014. In this file photo, police investigate a fatal shooting at a drug treatment center on Maryland Avenue.
Gov. Larry Hogan and Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young are set to meet to discuss ways the state can help the city’s leaders fight crime, as the number of killings in the city so far this year has eclipsed the figure tallied in all of 2014. In this file photo, police investigate a fatal shooting at a drug treatment center on Maryland Avenue. (Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun)

Gov. Larry Hogan and Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young are set to meet to discuss ways the state can help the city’s leaders fight crime as the number of killings in Baltimore so far this year eclipsed the figure tallied for all of 2014.

Hogan, a Republican, told reporters Wednesday that he and Young would meet next week, along with Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison.

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“It’s the city’s responsibility, but the state — as I’ve been saying forever — the state and federal government need to assist the city. It’s beyond what they can do by themselves and we’ve all got to jump in and do our part,” Hogan said.

Lester Davis, a spokesman for Young, said the Democratic mayor has specific ideas for what the state can contribute. Davis declined to say what they were because the mayor wants to raise them with Hogan first.

The governor also declined to discuss specifics.

The governor’s comments came a day after he, Young and Harrison met Tuesday at Shock Trauma with city police Sgt. Isaac Carrington, who was shot outside his Baltimore home while he was off duty.

Almost immediately after Carrington was shot last week, Hogan called on city leaders to do more to tackle crime and urged the Democratic-controlled General Assembly to pass a new mandatory sentencing bill for gun offenders. Any legislative change would not go into effect until next year, after the legislature convenes, and it’s not clear the bill favored by Hogan would have a significant impact.

The city police department’s latest figures show that overall rates of serious crime have dipped slightly through July, compared with the same period last year. But shootings and homicides have defied that trend — spiking 32% and 19%, respectively — and the number of homicides has reached 212 so far this year.

In 2014, the city saw 211 homicides. But in each of the years since, the year-end number has topped 300 and the city’s leaders have been unable to slow the bloodshed.

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