xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Study: Donors in Baltimore elections are disproportionately white, wealthy and not city residents

Baltimore’s elections are disproportionately influenced by campaign donors who are white, wealthy and not city residents, a new study has found.

In an analysis called “Big Money in Charm City,” conducted by the public policy organization Demos, researchers found that elections for mayor and Baltimore City Council are funded disproportionately by people who do not reflect the city’s voting population.

Advertisement

“Despite Baltimore’s racial and economic diversity, a disproportionately wealthy, white, and male donor class fuels some of the city’s most important races,” policy analyst Laura Williamson wrote in the Demos study. “Donors to the 2016 mayoral and city council elections were 64 percent white and 59 percent male, and nearly half of donor households — 48 percent — made over $100,000 per year.”

By contrast, Baltimore is 30 percent white and 47 percent male, and only 20 percent of the population makes $100,000 or more.

Advertisement
Big Money in the Charm City: The White, Wealthy Donor Class that Fuels Baltimore's Elections

Additionally, 43 percent of donations in city elections come from people who do not live in Baltimore, according to the study.

“It’s no surprise, then, that everyday Baltimoreans can feel like the city is not responding to the issues in their lives,” the study states.

Demos is advocating for more jurisdictions across the country to move toward public financing of elections.

Baltimore voters in 2018 approved a charter amendment that allows the City Council to create a public financing system for elections. The council still must pass additional legislation to design a system that could go into effect for the 2024 election.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement