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What they're saying about Martin O'Malley after Tuesday's debate

Here's what national publications have to say about Martin O'Malley's performance in Tuesday's Democratic debate:

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Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley tried to make inroads before she finally quipped that she had been "very pleased" to have his support for president when she ran eight years ago.

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During Tuesday night's Democratic Debate, presidential candidate and former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley confused the President of Russia with the President of Syria, provoking a quick dirge of Twitter reaction.

"I think Assad's invasion of Syria will be seen as a blunder," O'Malley said in a response to a question that was ultimately regarding whether Hillary Clinton was too quick to use military force during her time as Secretary of State.

But although the debate offered him a much needed chance at exposure, for O'Malley's campaign to truly take off, he needed more than one two good moments: he needed a strong, sustained showing throughout the entire debate, including his closing statement. And, luckily for O'Malley, he achieved it. His closing statement was a fitting culmination of his overall debate performance: strong, succinct, and effective at distinguishing himself from the other candidates. And he appealed to a larger amount of voters — especially youth voters — during an earnest address to the American people.

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Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley had a hard time finding a way to stand out from Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during the Democratic debate on Tuesday night, but he saved his absolute best material for his closing statement. During his final 90 seconds, O'Malley pointed out the huge difference between what happened tonight and what unfolded during the two Republican presidential debates.

"On this stage you didn't hear anyone denigrate women, you didn't hear anyone make racist comments about new immigrants, you didn't hear anyone speak ill of anyone because of their religious belief," O'Malley said. "What you heard was an honest debate of what will move us forward, to lead to a clean electric grid by 2050, and employ more of our people, rebuild our cities and towns, educate our children at higher and better levels, and include more people in the economic and social life in our country."

Ahead of Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate, the National Rifle Association criticized former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley for their records on gun control.

Neither Democrat had a problem returning the favor.

When candidates were asked to name their favorite enemy, O'Malley had only four words. "The National Rifle Association," he said to cheers.

The candidate who was commonly said to have the most to win or lose Tuesday was Martin O'Malley. It was hard to spot a breakout moment for him tonight, though he had several poised answers and managed to elicit big cheers from the audience. But he still struggled to break out—in part because Sanders has stolen his thunder as the progressive standard bearer.

CNN: 

The undercards couldn't seem more out of place on the debate stage.

There were moments of exceptions — particularly for Martin O'Malley who gave a strong closing argument —but the former Maryland governor failed to make a memorable case for his candidacy or draw distinctions with Sanders or Clinton. He had an opportunity to make an impression, and failed to take advantage.

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley made a veiled but sharp critique Tuesday of Hillary Clinton's vote to support the Iraq War.

"Leading us into Iraq under false pretenses and telling us as people that there were weapons of mass destruction there was one of the worst blunders in American history," O'Malley said during Tuesday's Democratic debate, raising his voice. "The reason people are still so angry about that is because they feel that our legislators got railroaded."

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