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O'Malley swipes Clinton over 'closeness' to banks

PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 18: Former Gov. Martin O'Malley (D-MD) speaks to around 2000 audience members at the Netroots Nation 2015 Presidential Town Hall at the Phoenix Convention Center July 18, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Democratic presidential candidate spoke of the criminal justice system in income inequality before being interrupted by demonstrators yelling 'Black Lives Matter' and challenging his record as mayor and governor. (Photo by Charlie Leight/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 565135779
PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 18: Former Gov. Martin O'Malley (D-MD) speaks to around 2000 audience members at the Netroots Nation 2015 Presidential Town Hall at the Phoenix Convention Center July 18, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Democratic presidential candidate spoke of the criminal justice system in income inequality before being interrupted by demonstrators yelling 'Black Lives Matter' and challenging his record as mayor and governor. (Photo by Charlie Leight/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 565135779 (Charlie Leight / Getty Images)

WASHINGTON -- Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley took a swipe at front runner Hillary Clinton on Monday for her "closeness" with Wall Street, offering one of his most direct attacks on that issue so far.

"My proposals go a lot further than Secretary Clinton's," O'Malley told a New Hampshire radio station, WKXL, in an interview that was recorded Sunday but aired Monday.

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"Her closeness with big banks on Wall Street is sincere, it's heart-felt, it's long established and well known," O'Malley said of Clinton. "I don't have those ties. I am independent of those big  banks on Wall Street."

The former two-term Maryland governor has subtly criticized Clinton on the issue before. During his announcement address in Baltimore he said that Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein indicated he would be "just fine" with either Clinton or Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush as president.

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The non-partisan fact checker PolitiFact later rated that claim "mostly false."

O'Malley has laid out a specific series of proposals that impose tough regulations and enforcement on the financial sector. The Democrat has called for reinstating the 1930s-era Glass-Steagall Act, which separated commercial and investment banks, and closing the revolving door between financial institutions and the government agencies that regulate them.

In her own speech on the issue last week, Clinton proposed a sliding scale capital gains tax rate that would encourage investors to hold equities for longer, rather than turning them over for quick profit.

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