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Martin O'Malley snared by satirical news site

Democratic presidential candidate former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley talks to Emma Stein about the Pay to Play Lobby System during a campaign stop with the Greater Derry- Londonderry Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, July 8, 2015, in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Democratic presidential candidate former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley talks to Emma Stein about the Pay to Play Lobby System during a campaign stop with the Greater Derry- Londonderry Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, July 8, 2015, in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)(Jim Cole / Associated Press)

Democrat Martin O'Malley received some unwanted attention on Thursday for citing a fake story from a satirical news site to underscore a point about the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington.

The presidential candidate and former Maryland governor included a cite to The Daily Currant in a white paper he unveiled Thursday that spells out his vision for strengthening Wall Street regulations. That site describes itself as a satirical news outlet.

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O'Malley's 10-page white paper included a footnote that referenced a Currant story suggesting that former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder had taken a "$77 million job" with JPMorgan Chase. "Holder will also fetch morning coffee and breakfast orders," the story said.

Aside from the slip -- deleted from a later version of the document -- O'Malley is hoping to court progressive Democrats with the populist, tough-on-Wall Street message he has been sounding since announcing his campaign for the Democratic nomination in May.

The paper calls for doubling funding at financial regulatory agencies, including the Securities and Exchange Commission, and mandating larger capital reserves at large banks, among other ideas.

"So here's the bad news -- for you: As president, I have no plans to let up on you," O'Malley wrote in an open letter to Wall Street released in tandem with the paper. "I'll work tirelessly to eliminate the unique danger posed by the handful of too-big-to-fail banks."

O'Malley appeared Thursday night on MNBC's "All In with Chris Hayes," a liberal host who spared his guest any embarrassing questions about the slip-up.

The former governor, taking advantage of a chance to address a high concentration of Democratic base voters, doubled down on his attack on Wall Street.

"You have a tiny small group of megabanks that apparently are too big to jail, too big to fail, too big to even manage and if they get that level of big, then they're too big and need to be broken up," he said.

Hayes quizzed O'Malley about his low approval rating when he left office and the loss of his anointed successor, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, to Republican Larry Hogan.

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O'Malley pointed out that he was not on the ballot and, in an implied criticism of Brown's campaign, said candidates always have to defend their records. He pointed to his convincing re-election in 2010 as an example.

"Don't run away from progressive values," he said. "Don't run away from the tough decisions you have to make to advance those goals and values and make them real."

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