xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Martin O'Malley seeks campaign finance reform as rivals post big hauls

Democratic presidential candidate, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, speaks during the Iowa Federation of Labor AFL-CIO Presidential Forum, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in Altoona, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall) ORG XMIT: IACN119
Democratic presidential candidate, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, speaks during the Iowa Federation of Labor AFL-CIO Presidential Forum, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in Altoona, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall) ORG XMIT: IACN119 (Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press)

WASHINGTON -- Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley said Thursday he would require companies to disclose their political donations and would advocate for other changes to the campaign finance system as his rivals for the nomination reported raising huge sums over the past three months.

The former two-term Maryland governor, who has been lagging in early state polls, said he would direct the Securities and Exchange Commission to require the publicly traded companies they regulate to disclose political spending to shareholders -- echoing an idea proposed by Hillary Clinton last month.

Advertisement

He also vowed to appoint commissioners at the Federal Election Commission to "assertively" enforce existing law.

O'Malley unveiled the ideas as his rivals, Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, pointed to major fundraising efforts in the third quarter. Clinton raised $28 million and Sanders brought in $26 million, according to the Associated Press.

Advertisement
Advertisement

O'Malley did not release figures, but his haul is likely to be significantly lower.

"This week marks the end of another campaign fundraising quarter. I'm not naive: Campaign resources are important," O'Malley said in a statement. "But the staggering figures required to run for the highest office in the land aren't as much a sign of muscle as they are an indication just how broken our democracy is."

O'Malley's plan includes several Democratic messaging staples endorsed by his opponents, such as support for a constitutional amendment to overturn the Citizens United Supreme Court decision the creation of a small-donor system for congressional races designed by Maryland Rep. John Sarbanes.

But despite anger over the current campaign finance system expressed by members of both political parties, there has been little movement on any of those ideas in Congress.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement