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Obama meets with Md. woman about health care law

President Obama meets with letter writers at the White House.
President Obama meets with letter writers at the White House.

WASHINGTON -- In an effort to draw attention to the end of this year's enrollment period for health insurance, President Barack Obama met Tuesday with 10 people -- including a Maryland woman -- who wrote letters to thank the administration for signing the Affordable Care Act.

Lynnette Jackson of Hyattsville, owner of a bakery, had written the president in August to report she had signed up for coverage through the Maryland exchange and was able to make her first doctor's appointment in five years.

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"When I opened the envelope containing my insurance card, I got a bit teary-eyed," she wrote, according to the White House. "Thank you a million times."

Jackson managed to sign up for coverage last year despite signifcant technical problems that plagued the state's exchange.

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The Obama administration is hoping to focus attention on the Feb. 15 open enrollment deadline, but the letter writers met with Obama on a day when House Republicans were preparing to hold their latest vote to repeal the controversial health care law.

Providing healthcare to citizens, Obama said, "is not some political, ideological battle. It's about people."

"My understanding is the House of Representatives has scheduled yet another vote today to take healthcare away from the folks sitting around this table," Obama said. "I don't know if it's the 55th or the 60th time that they are taking this vote, but I've asked this question before: Why is it this would be at the top of their agenda?"

The event also came amid anticipation about a Supreme Court case, King v. Burwell, that threatens to undermine the health care marketplaces that are central to the law. The decision in that case could determine whether subsidies may be offered to those purchasing coverage in states with marketplaces run by the federal government.

The court is set to hear arguments in that case March 4.

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