xml:space="preserve">
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 22: Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch listens at a press conference on June 22, 2016 in Washington, DC. Lynch and other government officials announced the result of a national Medicare fraud crackdown that took place in 36 districts around the country. (Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images) ** OUTS - ELSENT, FPG, CM - OUTS * NM, PH, VA if sourced by CT, LA or MoD **
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 22: Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch listens at a press conference on June 22, 2016 in Washington, DC. Lynch and other government officials announced the result of a national Medicare fraud crackdown that took place in 36 districts around the country. (Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images) ** OUTS - ELSENT, FPG, CM - OUTS * NM, PH, VA if sourced by CT, LA or MoD ** (Allison Shelley / Getty Images)

Senior Justice Department officials, including U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, will meet with city leaders, police chiefs and others from across the country in Baltimore next week to discuss strategies for reducing youth violence and gang activity, the department said Friday.

The fifth National Summit on Preventing Youth Violence will bring some 600 participants from more than 30 cities to the Inner Harbor. In addition to Lynch, Labor Secretary Tom Perez and Education Secretary John King will attend, as will Broderick Johnson, the Cabinet Secretary who helped spearhead the White House response to last year's riots after the death of Freddie Gray.

Advertisement

The summit has grown out of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention and the My Brother's Keeper Task Force, which President Barack Obama created in 2014 to address educational and economic gaps faced by boys and young men of color.

Baltimore has been a focus of the administration's efforts, particularly after last year's unrest. The Labor and Education departments both funneled additional money into programs in the city, and the Justice Department is investigating police practices. Homicides in the city have been down over last year, when killings spiked, but ahead of the pace of previous years.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement