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In a news conference on Main Street in Annapolis, Gov. Larry Hogan called the manufacturing jobs initiative his biggest disappointment of the General Assembly session that ends at midnight. (Mike Dresser/Baltimore Sun video)

An otherwise upbeat Gov. Larry Hogan called the failure of his proposed tax break for manufacturers his biggest disappointment of the General Assembly session that ends at midnight.

In a news conference on Main Street in Annapolis, Hogan lamented lawmakers' decision to shelve his proposal for property and income tax breaks for new manufacturing operations locating in Maryland.

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"We were trying to stimulate employment in the areas that needed it most, like Baltimore city, the Lower Eastern Shore and Western Maryland," Hogan said.

Legislators put off any action on the bill this year after hearing complaints from current Maryland manufacturing companies about a provision that would have extended income tax advantages of employees of those new firms -- fearing the break would draw away their workers.

Answering reporters' questions after having breakfast with Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford at Chick & Ruth's Delly, Hogan said the most important unresolved issue of the 90-day session is the tax cut package working its way through the legislature.

The Senate and House have adopted different versions of an income tax cut, and the differences must be resolved in discussions today or the effort will fail.

Hogan said he prefers the Senate bill.

"I like the across-the-board tax cuts and making sure everybody's taken care of, and I think that'll help most in stimulating our economy," he said.

The governor promised to keep pushing for tax cuts during the the next two legislative sessions of his term.

"We're going to keep coming back for tax relief every session," he said.

Hogan took advantage of the opportunity to make one final pitch for his proposal to entrust redistricting to an independent commission. In spite of his plea, neither House Speaker Michael E. Busch nor Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller is expected to allow a vote on the measure.

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