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Whether you're just tuning in or have been following the campaigns for months, we're here to help you feel as prepared as possible at the polls. Catch up on key races or refresh your memory on what the various ballot questions are asking with this roundup of our midterm election coverage.

Maryland votes: Here's what to expect Tuesday on Election Day at your polling place. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan and Democrat Ben Jealous are at the top of their parties' tickets, along with races for the U.S. Senate, U.S. House, state attorney general and the General Assembly.

For nearly four years, Gov. Larry Hogan has done something almost unthinkable for a Republican in Maryland: maintain sky-high job approval ratings. Hogan consistently polls as one of the most popular governors in the country. Hogan, 62, has achieved popularity through a blend of factors.

Democratic nominee Ben Jealous has released more than a dozen detailed proposals in his quest to unseat Republican Gov. Larry Hogan: Medicare for all. Free college tuition. Universal prekindergarten. Ending what Jealous calls mass incarceration. Cutting the state sales tax.

Baltimore County executive candidate and Democrat Johnny Olszewski Jr. describes himself as a “public school kid” who was the first in his family to go to college. He obtained a doctoral degree, taught in public schools and is raising a family in his hometown.

Baltimore County executive Al Redmer Jr., a Republican, grew up in Perry Hall and has lived in the community much of his life. He was elected four times to the House of Delegates, has worked in private industry and is Maryland's Insurance Commissioner.

What are Baltimore organizations and individuals doing to help get voters to the polls between early voting and Election Day? The initiatives range from driving voters to polling places to catering hot meals at registration sites and block parties.

Did you vote in Maryland's election? Why or why not? We want to hear from you.

Maryland's Howard County — a swing jurisdiction that’s had two Democrats and two Republicans as county executives since 1990 — often mirrors the sentiment of the state as a whole, and political observers are watching the Allan Kittleman-Calvin Ball race for signs of trends.

Steuart Pittman’s path to politics is atypical. He's never run a political campaign and he’s never held an elected position. But he doesn’t care.

Anne Arundel County Executive Steve Schuh comes off as an unassuming politician hellbent on slowing the growth of government. But by night he is an aggressive politician who attacks his opponents and drives race cars.

Attorney General Brian Frosh has emerged as the Maryland Democratic party’s chief opponent to President Donald Trump. But to Republican challenger Craig Wolf, Frosh’s focus on Washington has let down Maryland residents. Frosh says when he's protecting Marylanders, "it's right to jump in."

A high-energy race flips the script in Maryland’s 1st congressional district. The 1st District is among the liveliest – and most unusual — of Maryland’s eight congressional district races. Seven of the incumbents are seeking re-election. There's an open seat in the 6th District.

While Marylanders focus on the race for governor, political insiders have their eyes on an effort that could remake how governance works in the state. There's a Republican “Drive for Five” campaign to flip five seats in the state Senate. That would break the Democrats' supermajority.

Amid a national debate on access to the franchise, voters in Maryland will decide next month whether to allow same-day registration on Election Day for future elections. Del. Kirill Reznik has been pushing the idea for about a decade. He sees "it as part of a national conversation."

Baltimore voters get to decide at the polls whether to create an independent watchdog's office to ferret out misconduct by city officials, one of several questions on the ballot this year. If a majority approves, the inspector general’s office would come out from under the mayor’s office.

When Baltimore County voters go to the polls this fall, they’ll face 15 ballot questions, on top of the two statewide questions. Here’s a breakdown of the county’s ballot questions.

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