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July 16, 2015: Congressman John K. Delaney speaks to his audience. Politicians hosted a forum addressing OPM's announcement that Social Security numbers for 21.5 million people were stolen through a breach of agency databases. Photo by: Daniel Kucin Jr. No Mags, No Sales, No Internet, No TV
July 16, 2015: Congressman John K. Delaney speaks to his audience. Politicians hosted a forum addressing OPM's announcement that Social Security numbers for 21.5 million people were stolen through a breach of agency databases. Photo by: Daniel Kucin Jr. No Mags, No Sales, No Internet, No TV (Daniel Kucin Jr. / BALTIMORE SUN)

Rep. John Delaney, the last member of Maryland's congressional delegation to offer a position on the Iran deal, voted for the measure on Friday.

Delaney, a Montgomery County Democrat, joined with 162 Democrats backing a largely symbolic measure in the House to support the agreement. Republican leaders introduced the bill and then voted against to register their protest.

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Delaney joined with the all other House Democrats from Maryland to support the measure, though he said in a statement Friday that he thought the U.S. could have gotten a better deal.

"I hate to second guess negotiators, but this job requires me to do that. I view the [agreement] as a poorly negotiated deal on balance," said Delaney, widely viewed as a more centrist voice in the state's delegation.

"And while I would like to 'put the toothpaste back in the tube' and have another cut at getting a better deal for the American people and our ally Israel, I have concluded that this is impossible to do, particularly since the Senate failed to pass their resolution of disapproval, so I voted to approve the deal."

Sen. Ben Cardin, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and Rep. Andy Harris, a Baltimore County Republican, were the only two Maryland lawmakers to vote against the deal.

The House measure failed 162 to 269 a day after the Senate rendered the chamber's moves largely irrelevant by blocking a resolution of disapproval from receiving a final vote. If that resolution had passed President Barack would have been forced to veto it. Instead, the agreement will now move forward.

Under the agreement, negotiated by the United States, Iran, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China, Iran would allow stronger inspections of nuclear sites in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions.

Delaney said he would push the administsration to "fulfill their representations that they will pursue military action if Iran takes steps to get a nuclear bomb.

"Congress and the Administration must be clear-eyed in evaluating the true intentions of the Iranian regime and utterly dedicated to ensure that they fail in the pursuit of those objectives, even if it involves military action," he said.

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