Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, is seen past television cameras as he speaks during a debate with Republican candidate Larry Hogan at Maryland Public Television's studios in Owings Mills, Md., Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Pool) ORG XMIT: MDPS108
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, is seen past television cameras as he speaks during a debate with Republican candidate Larry Hogan at Maryland Public Television's studios in Owings Mills, Md., Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Pool) ORG XMIT: MDPS108 (Patrick Semansky / Baltimore Sun)

WASHINGTON – Former Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will report raising $122,000 since the beginning of April in his bid for Maryland's 4th Congressional District, a relatively small figure for a politician who held statewide office as recently as this year.

Brown, who served as former Gov. Martin O'Malley's lieutenant for eight years but lost his campaign for the top job to Republican Gov. Larry Hogan in November, will report having $140,000 on hand -- less than half the war chest available to another prominent Democrat in the race, former Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn Ivey.

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There have been recent signals pointing to a low fundraising quarter for Brown: Aides released an internal poll in early July, which some observers saw as an effort to mitigate fallout from lower-than-expected fundraising. The Democrat was also among the last in the state to preview his numbers -- waiting until the evening, hours before his report would be made public anyway.

By comparison, Ivey will report raising more than $275,000. In the 8th Congressional District -- which has a more wealthy donor base -- two candidates exceeded $500,000.

The second quarter covers April through the end of June. Brown reported raising just under $52,000 in the first quarter.

Brown was expected to post larger numbers in part because he presumably had some pieces of a statewide campaign finance operation still intact following his run for governor last year. His re-emergence into politics for the Prince George's County-based seat currently held by Rep. Donna F. Edwards also brought with it more media attention than was bestowed on other candidates.

But some have suggested anger over Brown's loss to Hogan could be limiting his ability to capture support from traditional bases of support and money in the party.

"We're running a grassroots campaign to strengthen our communities by ensuring economic security for all, world-class education, and a future where everyone -- not just the privileged few -- have the opportunity to succeed," Brown said in a statement. "We'll have the resources needed to win this race."

The numbers reflected a campaign operation that appeared to be struggling to get underway behind the scenes as well: Brown, who launched his congressional bid in March, already has replaced one finance director. And four months into the race, he has yet to hire a campaign manager.

One thing that Brown does have going for him -- and it's no small thing -- is high name recognition. After two terms as lieutenant governor, and eight years in the General Assembly before to that, Brown is well known. The internal poll released by his campaign showed that 93 percent of Democrats in the district know Brown and that nearly six in 10 have a favorable impression of him.

By contrast, about 67 percent of voters know Ivey, who was state's attorney in Prince George's County from 2003 to 2011.

The internal polling released by the two campaigns showed widely different assessments of the race. Brown's survey put him up 22 points over Ivey.

Ivey's poll, by contrast, had Brown up 6 points.

Brown, Ivey and several others are running to replace Edwards, who is seeking the Senate seat that will be left open in 2017 by retiring Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. Dels. Dereck E. Davis, Joseline A. Pena-Melnyk and former County Council member Ingrid M. Turner are also seeking the Democratic nomination.

The 4th District is based in Prince George's County, but since the 2011 redistricting, it also includes portions of Anne Arundel County. It is considered safe for Democrats in the General Election.

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