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Brown endorsed by national gun-control group

Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown waves to church members as he leaves the 7:45 am service at Ebenezer AME Church
Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown waves to church members as he leaves the 7:45 am service at Ebenezer AME Church(Algerina Perna, Baltimore Sun)

A national gun-control group endorsed Democrat Anthony G. Brown Tuesday in the race for governor, praising the lieutenant governor for supporting last year's gun law.

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence credited Brown for helping to pass a ban on assault weapon sales, stricter limits on magazine sizes and a new licensing requirement for handguns.

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Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed the new laws in the wake of a mass shooting at a Newtown, Conn. elementary school, but the Brady Campaign said it consider Brown a "leader" on the issue.

"Lt. Governor Brown has a long history of fighting to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people and he will protect Maryland's strong gun laws that will save lives," the organization's president, Dan Gross, said in a statement.

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Brown has sought to make gun-control a divisive issue in the campaign for governor, airing ads that highlight Republican nominee Larry Hogan's opposition to Maryland's new gun law. Brown has also drawn attention to the National Rifle Association's endorsement of Hogan, and pointed out Hogan he earned an A- rating based on the gun-rights group questionnaire.

On Tuesday, a group of mom's involved in the gun-control debate made their third trip to Hogan's campaign headquarters to requested that Hogan release the questionnaire to the public. Hogan has not yet released it, but Moms Demand Action members said Hogan's campaign was waiting with donuts and coffee on Tuesday.

"We'd have preferred transparency, but will take sugar and carbs in a pinch," said Jennifer Coulter, one of the moms.

Hogan has consistently said he would not roll back the gun law if elected, but he has wavered on stating his personal opinion of the law. He said during the Republican primary he did not support the law because it "went too far," but during a general election debate Hogan said the law did not go far enough.

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