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Ben Carson back in the mix for a job in Trump administration?

Republican Dr. Ben Carson speaks during a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, at The Classical Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Dr. Carson and Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin campaigned for Trump.
Republican Dr. Ben Carson speaks during a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, at The Classical Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo. Dr. Carson and Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin campaigned for Trump. (Christian Murdock / AP)

WASHINGTON — Less than a week after indicating he would not seek a position in President-elect Donald Trump's administration, retired Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Ben Carson seemed to soften that stance, indicating he would give any offer "serious consideration."

The renowned physician ran an unsuccessful campaign for president this year and then became an early and vocal surrogate for Trump.

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Carson's background in health care made him the center of speculation as a possible secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. His name has also come up as a potential Secretary of Education.

"Basically, I've said my preference is to be outside and to act as an adviser, but if after going through the process they all conclude it would be much better to have me in the Cabinet, I would have to give that very serious consideration," Carson told Fox News on Sunday. "It's just not my preference."

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The comments came days after Carson and his aides appeared to throw cold water on the idea of a job in the administration. His business manager and spokesman, Armstrong Williams, told several media outlets last week that Carson was not interested.

"Dr. Carson feels he has no government experience, he's never run a federal agency," Williams told The Hill newspaper in Washington. "The last thing he would want to do was take a position that could cripple the presidency."

Trump has focused since the election on building a national security team, but he has also met in recent days with several national education leaders.

Several Marylanders are under consideration for jobs in Trump's administration. John Bolton, a former ambassador to the United Nations, was floated early as a possible secretary of state. Montgomery County Republican David Bossie is considered a contender to lead the Republican National Committee. Rep. Andy Harris, the Baltimore County Republican, has said he would consider working for Trump if a job were offered.

Carson, 65, suspended his presidential campaign in March following a fifth-place finish on Super Tuesday and disappointing results in other early states. He initially spoke of a willingness to run as Trump's running mate, but later tamped down that talk.

At a speech in National Harbor earlier this year, Carson announced he would serve as the honorary chairman of My Faith Votes, a Colorado-based organization that seeks to turn out Christian voters.

A trailblazing pediatric neurosurgeon at Hopkins, Carson burst onto the political scene in 2013 with a speech at the annual National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. Observers focused on his criticism of the policies of President Barack Obama — who was sitting feet away during the address.

Two years later, Carson entered the race for the Republican nomination, arguing that the nation needed an outside voice to fix national politics. His campaign theme would later play on his career as the head of pediatric neurosurgery at Hopkins: "Heal, inspire, revive."

The relationship between Trump and Carson was contentious during the primary. Trump often described Carson as "low-energy," and once compared him to a child molester. At one point, the two questioned each other's religious faith.

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