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How well do you know Baltimore? It's all in the details |...

<style> #ender { margin: 0 0 30px 0; } #ender strong { margin: 30px auto 30px auto; display: block; font-weight: normal; } #formbtn { padding: 6px; border: 1px solid white; text-transform: uppercase; font-weight: normal !important; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto 0 auto; text-decoration: none; font-size: .925em; } #ender a, #ender a:hover, #ender a:active, #ender a:visited { color: white; text-decoration: none; font-weight: normal !important; } </style> <div style="width:100%"> <div id="ender"> <strong><b>What should we detail next?</b><br><br> You can help determine where we train our lens next. It can be a specific thing (the cupola of the Rawlings Conservatory) or a category of things (parks landmarks) — as long as it’s a Baltmore thing. </strong> <a id="formbtn" href="https://www.baltimoresun.com/about/bs-photo-quiz-suggestions-20210308-oxf6nzlcvjgyjkmenaawrqbsse-story.html" target="_blank">Suggest a subject</a> </div> </div>
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Can you recognize a Baltimore landmark from a small detail? See how well you know the city.
(Denise Sanders)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
<style> #ender { margin: 0 0 30px 0; } #ender strong { margin: 30px auto 30px auto; display: block; font-weight: normal; } #formbtn { padding: 6px; border: 1px solid white; text-transform: uppercase; font-weight: normal !important; text-align: center; margin: 0 auto 0 auto; text-decoration: none; font-size: .925em; } #ender a, #ender a:hover, #ender a:active, #ender a:visited { color: white; text-decoration: none; font-weight: normal !important; } </style> <div style="width:100%"> <div id="ender"> <strong><b>What should we detail next?</b><br><br> You can help determine where we train our lens next. It can be a specific thing (the cupola of the Rawlings Conservatory) or a category of things (parks landmarks) — as long as it’s a Baltmore thing. </strong> <a id="formbtn" href="https://www.baltimoresun.com/about/bs-photo-quiz-suggestions-20210308-oxf6nzlcvjgyjkmenaawrqbsse-story.html" target="_blank">Suggest a subject</a> </div> </div>
What should we detail next?

You can help determine where we train our lens next. It can be a specific thing (the cupola of the Rawlings Conservatory) or a category of things (parks landmarks) — as long as it’s a Baltmore thing.
Suggest a subject
How well do you know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This door is from The Episcopal Church of St. Michael and All Angels, 2013 St. Paul Street, in the Charles North neighborhood. The church was designed in the Romanesque Revival style by Wyatt & Sperry, 1882.
This door is from The Episcopal Church of St. Michael and All Angels, 2013 St. Paul Street, in the Charles North neighborhood. The church was designed in the Romanesque Revival style by Wyatt & Sperry, 1882. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This door is from a Victorian rowhouse at 1908 Mount Royal Terrace, in the Mount Royal Terrace Historic District of Reservoir Hill. The eclectic Medieval style dating back to c.1880s features a balcony that looks out onto a small park and beyond to an entrance for I-83.
This door is from a Victorian rowhouse at 1908 Mount Royal Terrace, in the Mount Royal Terrace Historic District of Reservoir Hill. The eclectic Medieval style dating back to c.1880s features a balcony that looks out onto a small park and beyond to an entrance for I-83. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This door is from The Homewood Museum at 3400 North Charles Street, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University. Built for the Carroll family in 1801, it is a fine example of Federal-period Palladian architecture and a National Historic Landmark.
This door is from The Homewood Museum at 3400 North Charles Street, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University. Built for the Carroll family in 1801, it is a fine example of Federal-period Palladian architecture and a National Historic Landmark. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How well do you know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis)
Did you guess right?
This door at 914 Tyson Street, in the Mid-Town Belvedere neighborhood, is part of a block of working-class rowhouses from the first half of the 19th century that became an artists' colony a century later. This door, with similarities to Homewood House - though greatly scaled-down - is probably an addition from a Bohemian resident in the 1900s.
This door at 914 Tyson Street, in the Mid-Town Belvedere neighborhood, is part of a block of working-class rowhouses from the first half of the 19th century that became an artists' colony a century later. This door, with similarities to Homewood House - though greatly scaled-down - is probably an addition from a Bohemian resident in the 1900s. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This forlorn door is from the former Martick's at 214 W. Mulberry Street in downtown Baltimore. Many Baltimoreans have fond memories of walking through this corner door ( an addition from the 1900s) to enter Martick's, which served different generations as a speakeasy, tavern and French restaurant. Preservationists have been fighting to save this last 19th century structure on the block.
This forlorn door is from the former Martick's at 214 W. Mulberry Street in downtown Baltimore. Many Baltimoreans have fond memories of walking through this corner door ( an addition from the 1900s) to enter Martick's, which served different generations as a speakeasy, tavern and French restaurant. Preservationists have been fighting to save this last 19th century structure on the block. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city.
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This door is from 1617 Park Avenue, a large Renaissance Revival rowhouse, c. 1880, in Bolton Hill. Note the Renaissance-inspired scallop shells over the third-floor windows.
This door is from 1617 Park Avenue, a large Renaissance Revival rowhouse, c. 1880, in Bolton Hill. Note the Renaissance-inspired scallop shells over the third-floor windows. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
How Well Do You Know Baltimore?
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. Note the "faux bois," an imitated wood grain paint finish, which the artist-owner called a "pandemic project."
Do you recognize this door in Baltimore? It's a small detail seen in the city. Note the "faux bois," an imitated wood grain paint finish, which the artist-owner called a "pandemic project." (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Did you guess right?
This door is from 921 North Calvert Street in Mount Vernon, from a group of rowhouses with Italianate-style facades dating to the late 1850s.
This door is from 921 North Calvert Street in Mount Vernon, from a group of rowhouses with Italianate-style facades dating to the late 1850s. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
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