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Log cabin renovation | PHOTOS

The log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historic Black community, was moved to this Hagerstown site circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. The logs are now protected by new Hardie Plank siding.
(Amy Davis)
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The renovation of a 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street in Hagerstown by Preservation Maryland is nearing completion.
(Amy Davis)
Log cabin renovation
The log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historic Black community, was moved to this Hagerstown site circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. The logs are now protected by new Hardie Plank siding.
The log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historic Black community, was moved to this Hagerstown site circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. The logs are now protected by new Hardie Plank siding. (Amy Davis)
Log cabin renovation
The Hagerstown log cabin, right, was moved to this site at 417 Jonathan Street circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined that the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. At left is a late 19th century Victorian house.
The Hagerstown log cabin, right, was moved to this site at 417 Jonathan Street circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined that the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. At left is a late 19th century Victorian house. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, outside the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community. The small house, covered with new Hardie Plank siding, was moved to 417 Jonathan Street circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. Preservation Maryland purchased the home with the twin goals of renovating this significant structure into a home for a low-income resident, and demonstrating that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community.
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, outside the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community. The small house, covered with new Hardie Plank siding, was moved to 417 Jonathan Street circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. Preservation Maryland purchased the home with the twin goals of renovating this significant structure into a home for a low-income resident, and demonstrating that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, walks in the backyard of the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. Redding studies the ground where three archaeological pits were dug recently, where some fragments from past occupants can still be found near the surface.
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, walks in the backyard of the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. Redding studies the ground where three archaeological pits were dug recently, where some fragments from past occupants can still be found near the surface. (Amy Davis)
Log cabin renovation
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, with some pottery shards from the mid-19th century, and an early 20th century button, which he found on the ground after three archaeological pits were dug for research about the log cabin.
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, with some pottery shards from the mid-19th century, and an early 20th century button, which he found on the ground after three archaeological pits were dug for research about the log cabin. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Detail of the exposed logs sandwiched between chinking in the back room of a log cabin restored by Preservation Maryland in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The cabin, at 417 Jonathan Street, was moved to this site circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739.
Detail of the exposed logs sandwiched between chinking in the back room of a log cabin restored by Preservation Maryland in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The cabin, at 417 Jonathan Street, was moved to this site circa 1830, but dendrochronology has determined the logs used in its original construction were felled in the winter of 1739. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, at the foot of the stairs to the second floor of the 18th c. log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The small house at 417 Jonathan Street has been renovated and expanded, with new windows, cooling and heating systems, plus insulation, probably for the first time. The unfinished second floor is intended to be used for storage.
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, at the foot of the stairs to the second floor of the 18th c. log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The small house at 417 Jonathan Street has been renovated and expanded, with new windows, cooling and heating systems, plus insulation, probably for the first time. The unfinished second floor is intended to be used for storage. (Amy Davis)
Log cabin renovation
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, inside the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The small 18th century house at 417 Jonathan Street has been renovated, with a new kitchen, bathroom, and an additional room, and new plumbing, electrical and air conditioning systems. Many architectural elements from its log cabin origins have been preserved, such as the ceiling pictured.
Nicholas Redding, president of Preservation Maryland, inside the log cabin that his nonprofit organization has restored in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. The small 18th century house at 417 Jonathan Street has been renovated, with a new kitchen, bathroom, and an additional room, and new plumbing, electrical and air conditioning systems. Many architectural elements from its log cabin origins have been preserved, such as the ceiling pictured. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
The 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historic Black community in Hagerstown has been restored by Preservation Maryland with the twin goals of creating a home for a low-income resident, and demonstrating that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community. The original structural beams supporting the second floor have been exposed.
The 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historic Black community in Hagerstown has been restored by Preservation Maryland with the twin goals of creating a home for a low-income resident, and demonstrating that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community. The original structural beams supporting the second floor have been exposed. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Anna Scott, 91, has lived her entire life on Jonathan Street, in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. She is pleased to see the renovation of the 18th c. log cabin across the street from her home.
Anna Scott, 91, has lived her entire life on Jonathan Street, in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. She is pleased to see the renovation of the 18th c. log cabin across the street from her home. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
JoAnn Claybon, 68, has lived on Jonathan Street, the heart of an historically Black neighborhood in Hagerstown, for more than 40 years. Like other longtime residents, she is happy that Preservation Maryland has purchased an 18th c. log cabin nearby, in order to renovate it for a low-income resident, and to demonstrate that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community.
JoAnn Claybon, 68, has lived on Jonathan Street, the heart of an historically Black neighborhood in Hagerstown, for more than 40 years. Like other longtime residents, she is happy that Preservation Maryland has purchased an 18th c. log cabin nearby, in order to renovate it for a low-income resident, and to demonstrate that preservation can play a broader role in improving a community. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
The renovation of a 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street in Hagerstown by Preservation Maryland is nearing completion. To make the small home more functional for a new inhabitant, a room behind the original two-room log cabin was built, following research that indicated that an historic addition based on the same footprint existed at one time.
The renovation of a 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street in Hagerstown by Preservation Maryland is nearing completion. To make the small home more functional for a new inhabitant, a room behind the original two-room log cabin was built, following research that indicated that an historic addition based on the same footprint existed at one time. (Amy Davis)
Log cabin renovation
During the renovation of an 18th c. log cabin in Hagerstown by Preservation Maryland, a wood partition wall was discovered under plaster in the front bedroom.
During the renovation of an 18th c. log cabin in Hagerstown by Preservation Maryland, a wood partition wall was discovered under plaster in the front bedroom. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
A narrow flight of stairs leads to the unfinished second floor of an 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historically Black community in Hagerstown.
A narrow flight of stairs leads to the unfinished second floor of an 18th c. log cabin at 417 Jonathan Street, in a historically Black community in Hagerstown. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
New windows and insulation can be seen in this attic, which is intended to be used by the homeowner for storage.
New windows and insulation can be seen in this attic, which is intended to be used by the homeowner for storage. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Log cabin renovation
Jonathan Street, a historically Black community in Hagerstown, was at one time the home for both freed and enslaved Blacks. An 18th c. log cabin, facing the 19th c. houses pictured here, was moved to 417 Jonathan Street in the 1830s. Preservation Maryland has renovated the log cabin, now covered with siding, to help preserve a modest but historically significant structure that had faced possible demolition. The goal is have the home occupied by a low-income resident, and to help spark more investment in a community that has historically been neglected.
Jonathan Street, a historically Black community in Hagerstown, was at one time the home for both freed and enslaved Blacks. An 18th c. log cabin, facing the 19th c. houses pictured here, was moved to 417 Jonathan Street in the 1830s. Preservation Maryland has renovated the log cabin, now covered with siding, to help preserve a modest but historically significant structure that had faced possible demolition. The goal is have the home occupied by a low-income resident, and to help spark more investment in a community that has historically been neglected. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
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