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Vehicle emissions test fails to prove its value

I agree with Al Nalley about the emissions test being a money grab ("Paying out-of-state company for emissions testing is too costly," Catonsville Times, Nov. 30).

I just traded in my 1999 Ford 150 and it never had a problem passing this useless test.

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I have never had a vehicle fail and I keep them for 10 years or more. This is my fourth Ford truck since 1978 and none of them ever had a problem.

At least we shouldn't need to get them tested for 5-6 years, because the first tune-up isn't due until 100,000 miles.

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I realize that the test is designed to help people with breathing problems. But more pollution is caused by making thousands of vehicles drive to the site.

A little known fact: buying a used vehicle causes the state to immediately send an emission test date.

About seven years ago, I bought a used vehicle for my daughter and another for my wife four years later.

Both had recently been tested and passed. Even though a year remained before retesting was required, the state sent another notice, in an effort to steal our money.

When I wrote to Del. James Malone about this rip-off, I was referred to the Department of Motor Vehicles. The clerk said it would be too much trouble to check it out before ordering another test.

If you buy a used vehicle and receive an emissions notice, call to see when the test was last performed.

I know someone whose engine light showed that the catalytic converter needed to be replaced.

After his mechanic reset the light, the vehicle passed the test, proof that it should be eliminated instead of causing us another expense.

Joe Heldmann

Catonsville

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