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What time is it? Time for Cub Scouts

Some of the approximately 700 Scouts gather in the den area as they prepare to head out across the grounds during the Harford County District Cub Scout Day Camp at the Harford County Equestrian Center Tuesday.
Some of the approximately 700 Scouts gather in the den area as they prepare to head out across the grounds during the Harford County District Cub Scout Day Camp at the Harford County Equestrian Center Tuesday. (MATT BUTTON | AEGIS STAFF, Homestead Publishing)

What time is it when an elephant sits on your fence?

Time to get a new fence!

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When does an elephant have eight legs?

When there are two elephants!

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And when does the Equestrian Center become overrun with joke-telling boys?

When it's the week of the Harford County District Cub Scout Day Camp!

These are only a sampling of the jokes visitors to the Harford County Equestrian Center and surrounding fields (better known to some as the site of the Harford County Farm Fair) will hear this week as the Cub Scouts clamber to share jokes with camp staffers in exchange for canary yellow tickets.

Beginning Monday and continuing through Friday, 703 Cub Scouts from across Harford County are descending upon the grounds and fields of the Equestrian Center to play baseball and Frisbee, learn how to tie knots and administer first aid, use a bow and arrow and shoot a BB gun, among many other activities. Because the theme of the camp this year is "Cub Scouts Under the Big Top," the scouts also have the opportunity to try their hands at juggling and tightrope walking; a "three-ring circus" including BMX riders will perform for the cubs on Friday, when raffles will be held using the yellow tickets the Cub Scouts earned throughout the week.

Keeping 703 children between the ages of 5 and 11 safe and happy from 8:30 in the morning to 4:30 in the afternoon takes a lot of effort. Krissy Flatau, a registrar for the camp, which is run entirely by volunteers, said she and her colleagues, including Gina Miller, the day camp director, have been planning and organizing the camp since February. There are more than 500 volunteers participating in the camp, including Boy Scouts like 11-year-old Nathan Nash from Troop 313, who had previously participated in the camp as a Cub Scout.

"Volunteering and working with the younger kids is really fun," he said. Before returning to his position assisting Cub Scouts as they used an air cannon to fire tennis balls into a field for their peers to catch, Nathan added that he plans on doing "a lot of volunteering" in the future.

The Cub Scouts firing the cannon were from packs 809, 820, 999 and 826. Some Cub Scouts attended the camp with their entire den, while other campers came by themselves and were integrated into other dens. The Cub Scouts working the air cannon came from all across Harford County, but all agreed that "It's fun shooting a cannon." Archery was nominated as their second-favorite activity of the day, "because you get to shoot arrows." The Cub Scouts then returned to loading their air cannon with tennis balls, eager to fire as many as possible before they moved on to their next activity of the day.

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