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Acme grocery store employees go on strike [50 years ago]

As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, April 23, 1964:

Members of the Local 692 of the AFL-CIO Retail Clerks International Association went on strike 50 years ago against 57 Acme Markets, causing the closure of Harford County's grocery chain stores. The other chains in Harford County, Safeway and A&P, closed voluntarily in support of the strike. The independent grocery stores saw an increase in their business because of the strike. Some of these independent stores stayed open late into the evening hours as customers jammed check-out lines. The independent store owners believed that the strike would help their business with new customers venturing into their stores with the hope that they would become permanent buyers.

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A building permit was issued to Theodore Julio and Sons for the construction of a new A&P supermarket on the property on Route 1 opposite the abandoned race track. Construction was expected to begin immediately on the site which had been in dispute in the courts. Seven Bel Air merchants appealed the decision, which permitted the shopping center in the Court of Appeals. The Julio group desired to build a large shopping center on 44 acres..

During the razing of the old Sheriff's residence on Main Street, some interesting old documents were found. One of the first receipts found was for a year's subscription to The Aegis in 1869. The then publisher, F.W. Baker, was receiving $3 a year for a small, four-page paper. Another receipt was for a $6.28 premium paid to the Harford Mutual Insurance Company in 1861. A large number of items were billed to R.R. Carmen, the former sheriff of Harford County. His purchases in the 1865-66 period included a trader's license, 47 pounds of cheese for $11.28, 50 pounds of rice for $6, a receipt for $15.40 for two calves weighing 220 pounds, 50 bars of soap for $6.50 and other payments made for livery bills. One clipping found told of John O'Neill exhorting his men to continue resistance during the famed attack on Havre de Grace and an article reporting that Edwin Booth packed the Chestnut Hill Opera House in Philadelphia while presenting a play.

The Harford Theatre Association found its new home for its Summer Theatre program in a barn on the new Harford Junior College campus at Schuck's Corner. The association had a full summer of professional musical theatre planned for its new location. Once the Harford Theater was established as a successful venture, it was hoped it could grow into a summer festival theater specializing in musical theater and operetta. No festival theater of this kind existed on the East Coast, and the one in Harford County would be a business and cultural benefit to the community.

The Board of Trustees of Harford Junior College announced the appointment of Alfred C. O'Connell as the college's president. O'Connell stated that he felt honored to have been selected to become president of the Harford Junior College and was looking forward to both a challenging and a rewarding experience.

Postmaster Louis Stoddard of Joppa made the following request to patrons: "There is some confusion in Harford about mailing addresses. Some houses were recently numbered. Your Post Office is also concerned with your use of your Zip Code number. This is not experimental. It is a permanent and essential part of the mail address of every American. Know yours-use it. Address correspondents by their Zip Codes. The place for the Zip Code number is immediately after the State. All residents should have a house number by now. House numbers were assigned by your County Planning and Zoning Commission with the cooperation and blessings of your local Post Office. If you do not know yours, get it. It is a house number and it is permanent. It must be on your mail box. This is required. Do not use your old box number. Your use of a complete and accurate address can improve your personal mail service and slow down its increasing cost to you."

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