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Yearbooks have their limits

In the article, "As yearbooks die, colleges lose a link to the past," (May 2), several university faculty members suggest that a yearbook offers documentation of experiences and legacies that social media cannot provide. However, I disagree with this assertion, and I believe that social media offers more.

As a 2009 graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, I purchased a yearbook. But as a 2013 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, I did not. By the time I completed college, I had many memories collected in Facebook photo albums, favorited tweets and Instagram videos. It's easy for me to search through my social media pages and recall special moments along with commentary from friends and family who engaged with the social media post.

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Social media has the advantage of being more dynamic and visually appealing than a yearbook which often comes in black and white (unless paid for at a premium price).

Similarly, with the invention of "the cloud" and online data storage, high-quality photos can be kept safe for as long as the Internet exists from damaging elements that can destroy physical books.

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Although I enjoyed looking through my older cousin's yearbooks growing up as a child, I can appreciate their collection of nostalgic memories and log into a social media platform to experience my own.

Joseph Pate, Sykesville

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