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There was no way, in the interests of journalistic accuracy, for The Baltimore Sun to completely ignore the results of yesterday's Republican mayoral primary. But its editors tried. Oh, how they tried. Yes, on the left side of the front page are the numbers. But the story itself was consigned to fewer than three lines, buried in the body of the story that jumped to Page 15 ("Ex-mayor falls short in her bid for redemption," April 27).

Dan Rodricks' column mentions the Republicans having "abandoned" Baltimore 50 years ago. And Reuters, the international news service, observes that the winner of the Democratic primary will "almost certainly" become Baltimore's next mayor. But this Republican hasn't abandoned anything. And the operative word in the Reuters story is "almost," not "certainly." Because nothing is certain in any election year, much less this one.

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Over the next six months, I will pursue with the all the energy, purpose and commitment I can muster the message that Baltimore is one city, not two: Not black and white, not haves and have-nots. But a city filled with hundreds of thousands of remarkable people who are capable of overcoming any challenge and solving any problem when encouraged by enlightened and visionary leadership.

Ronald Reagan once said that the most terrifying words in the English language are "I'm from the government and I'm here to help." He understood that the government often does not help but, instead, prevents the people from helping themselves.

What I offer is leadership that will create the environment and the structure which allows things to happen for the benefit of all Baltimoreans regardless of parochial concerns or party affiliation. This is our home. And together we can and will take good care of it.

Alan Walden, Baltimore

The writer is Baltimore's Republican nominee for mayor.

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