Mitt Romney and his fellow Republican anti-Trump advocates are right about their cause but their reasoning is fraudulent ("GOP delegates: Vote no to Trump," July 5). He said, "conservative principles are dedicated to lifting people out of poverty and helping create opportunity for all." They believe their party's better than Donald Trump. After proving how daft he is, repeatedly, the other candidates, pundits and GOP regulars said, with arrogant certainty, "Trump will never be our candidate!"

Two words: "Southern Strategy." It was introduced nationally by Richard Nixon, and it was about promoting racism. In 2003, the chairman of the Republican National Committee apologized to the NAACP for "exploiting racial polarization to win elections." Voter identification laws produced by Republican-controlled state legislatures after the Voting Rights Act was changed are the latest evidence that the strategy is still in place.

Advertisement

The party's idol, Ronald Reagan, went to Mississippi and spoke of "states' rights" and his devotion to restoring them. States' rights "justified" segregation, Jim Crow and all their unconstitutional depravity. He opposed the Fair Housing Act, the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act and Congress overrode his veto of the anti-apartheid bill. His "welfare queen" speech about a black woman bilking the government out of $150,000 even as defense contractors were bilking it out of hundreds of millions of dollars was clearly racist. President Reagan's son Ron later said he believes his father, "was vulnerable to the ideas that poor people were somehow poor because it was their fault."

American history is full of good and disgraceful Republican and Democratic politicians so Donald Trump is nothing new. Mitt Romney and his cohorts should refrain from their hypocrisy, be loyal to their country and work toward building a party as concerned for every American as Mr. Romney was when he championed health care reform (the precursor to Obamacare) in Massachusetts. Better to idolize a real Republican like Margaret Chase Smith, the first to condemn Sen. Joseph McCarthy on the floor of Congress, and who said, "I don't want to see the Republican Party ride to political victory on the four horseman of calumny — fear, ignorance, bigotry and smear." Senator McCarthy removed her from the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations and gave her seat to then-Senator Nixon.

Jeffrey Michael Bolden, Washington, D.C.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement