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Congressional Dems were right to boycott Trump's inauguration

Nick Belluzzo brought his 8-year-old daughter Elia up from Williamsburg to the Women's March on Washington Jan. 21, 2017. The pair drove up with some friends Saturday morning, and Elia made her own sign for the event. The march came one day after President Donald Trump's inauguration at the Capitol Building and drew around 500,000 people.

I beg to differ with letter writer Douglas Roberts, who thinks elected leaders who "boycotted" President Donald Trump's inauguration were being "divisive, counterproductive and childish" ("Inauguration 'boycott' is counterproductive and wrong," Jan. 19).

When President Barack Obama took office, the Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell spoke volumes about what the Republican Congress was going to do. He said they would not allow any legislation that Mr. Obama initiated to pass. Remember his remark about making Mr. Obama "a one-term president?"

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Nearly 3 million more people voted for Hillary Clinton than for Donald Trump. The Republican-controlled Senate wouldn't even give Mr. Obama's Supreme Court nominee a hearing, even though it had praised him in the past. It was the Republican Congress that boycotted Mr. Obama.

As to Mr. Roberts' claim that voters displeased by Mr. Obama's election did not protest, complain or whine, he must not have paid any attention to those who posted on media, Twitter and Facebook to attack him from day one. The president and his family were fodder for the lowlifes who spewed hateful, racist remarks and compared the First Family to gorillas.

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Mr. Trump and his family will not have to endure such attacks, which were practiced by so many out of malice but who are now taken aback that anyone would do such things to the candidate they supported.

Lois Raimondi Munchel, Forest Hill

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