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Hogan, Rutherford have no friends in Baltimore

Lieutenant Gov. Boyd Rutherford styled himself as a guy who would "make the trains run on time" in claiming that rapid bus service is the way to go for Baltimore ("Who knew Hogan, Rutherford were such transit geeks?" July 15).

It's easy for him to say this because he doesn't have a three-hour commute to work from Sandtown to Towson. Even a spokeswoman for his boss, Gov. Larry Hogan, said a rapid bus line Baltimore City is "not something being actively pursued."

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The question that comes to my mind is why rapid buses weren't the answer for the Purple Line extension of the Washington metro in suburban Maryland. They would certainly be cheaper.

The other question is whence came this interest of the lieutenant governor in buses as opposed to trains? I remember when the Ehrlich administration touted the building of rapid bus lanes a decade ago from Fells Point to Woodlawn — none of which were ever built.

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It is hard for any Baltimorean to take seriously whatever Mr. Hogan, Mr. Rutherford or state Transportation Secretary Peter K. Rahn say in the wake of their devastating decision to wreck the Red Line.

But even the pants-on-fire statements of that trio of Baltimore haters are easier to digest than the statement of Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett, who said the decision "had no hint of politics or partisanship whatsoever."

Ike, pal, if you ever run for statewide office, don't expect any votes from Baltimore City.

Paul R. Schlitz Jr., Baltimore

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