xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Selling Sail Baltimore

As a passionate fan of visiting ships (tall, military or otherwise), I'm delighted Sail Baltimore is reaching out to foreign attaches from around the world ("Five questions for Sail Baltimore's executive director Laura Stevenson," April 17).

When ships dock at the Inner Harbor, I try visit each one. I enjoy talking to the officers and crew, even if it means communicating in my limited Spanish, French or German. They are always delighted to hear from people who actually live here.

Advertisement

This is something Sail Baltimore overlooks. The Inner Harbor is a residential neighborhood, along with Little Italy, Harbor East, Fells Point and Federal Hill. But this is never taken into account. Sail Baltimore must do a better job reaching out to us and finding ways we might interact with visitors.

So often, people learn about visiting ships only after they have departed — there are wonderful pictures and descriptions in the media. But we need information in advance.

Advertisement

I'm aware of Sail Baltimore's website and try to follow the names and descriptions of every visiting vessel. But this takes effort. Sail Baltimore should put announcements of ship arrivals in downtown hotels, residential buildings, neighborhood bulletin boards and other outlets. Why not start a local welcoming committee? Or perhaps get schools involved?

But what was missing from Sail Baltimore Executive Director Laura Stevenson's familiarization effort was our new city slogan — Baltimore: Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner.

I'll bet every one of those foreign attaches recognizes the song. Baltimore should use it. The National Anthem could be an important selling point for Baltimore and U.S. history.

Rosalind Ellis Heid, Baltimore

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement