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Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger's bill with Rep. Mike Rogers of the House Intelligence Committee is a curious piece of legislation ("Aid to battle cyber threats," Dec. 4).

Who is being represented by this legislation? That it involves the National Security Agency, which is busy tapping our phones, entering our computers and otherwise invading the privacy of American citizens and foreigners, should be very unsettling. Government spying on citizens should always be a concern in a democracy.

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Then there are the beneficiaries of this legislation — some big corporations. Mitt Romney's comments to the contrary, corporations are not people. Mr. Ruppersberger wants the taxpayer-funded U.S. government to share cyber security information with big corporations, many of them the same ones shipping jobs overseas and dodging taxes through congressionally-engineered loopholes. To add insult to injury, this could be information the government is siphoning off from U.S. citizens. Of course, we won't know what information because the government and Mr. Ruppersberger's committee will prevent the information from ever being made public even though the public is paying for it.

All of this is comes at a time when people are out of work, when 50 million Americans are without health insurance, when America's infrastructure is crumbling, when wars that Mr. Ruppersberger supports have driven the U.S. government to the brink of bankruptcy. I realize the House Intelligence Committee narrowly focuses its activities to rooting for the good guys and going after the bad guys — all in a world where there are only different shades of gray. But this piece of legislation shows a terrible lack of priorities. Mr. Ruppersberger is a Democrat and he should be promoting Democratic issues, not ones that benefit super-rich, big corporations.

Christopher Boardman

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