Latest federal decree seems selective about which religious values are forced on women.

I am wondering if the new “conscience protections” in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services regulations allow health care providers and purchasers of health plans to choose which of the Ten Commandments they want to use to support their intolerance (“Trump defends health workers’ right to object to abortions,” May 6)? When Moses brought them down from the mountain, he did not say one commandment was more important than another, that people could choose to follow one and not another.

For example, health care to those who steal could be denied. Thou shalt not steal is commandment number eight. Or how about denying care to those who lie, since the ninth commandment prohibits lying? It seems that those who need “conscience protections” are focused on sex and in particular, women and sex. What about prescribing erectile dysfunction medications to married men who choose to use them outside of their marital relationship?

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Wouldn’t the provider or insurer with a conscience want to make sure that he or she is not assisting in a forbidden activity? The last I checked, “Thou shall not commit adultery,” was the seventh commandment.

Bernadette Solounias, Havre de Grace

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