xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Baltimore’s groundbreaking women artists deserve a retrospective

Amy Sherald. Planes, rockets, and the spaces in between. 2018. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchased with exchange funds from the Pearlstone Family Fund and partial gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Amy Sherald. Planes, rockets, and the spaces in between. 2018. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Purchased with exchange funds from the Pearlstone Family Fund and partial gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. (Courtesy Baltimore Museum of Art)

Your article on redressing the lack of exposure for women artists in local museums was read with interest by my wife whose large serigraph “Soaring Red” hung in the Baltimore Museum, all the way back in 1971, as part of the Bienalle (“Baltimore Museum of Art will only acquire works from women next year: ‘You have to do something radical,'” Nov. 15).

Betsey Heuisler was 26 at the time and still a graduate student at the Maryland Institute. She went on to have 400 of her paintings in private and corporate collections worldwide and galleries coast-to-coast. She also taught at MICA here and in Mexico, headed the art department at Gilman, and even taught a medical school course in arts and humanities at the University of Maryland.

Advertisement

Betsey and other women pioneers in all fields did it largely without institutional support. So perhaps one local museum could mount a retrospective of work by Betsey, Grace Hardigan and others who persevered locally without the long overdue recognition women artists are now having.

Stan Heuisler, Baltimore

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement