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It’s clear a lot of white people like their history well scrubbed | READER COMMENTARY

John Wayne's performance as Davy Crockett in the 1960 film, "The Alamo," represents the kind of sanitized view of U.S. history that is fiercely debated today. (Handout/Batjac Productions).
John Wayne's performance as Davy Crockett in the 1960 film, "The Alamo," represents the kind of sanitized view of U.S. history that is fiercely debated today. (Handout/Batjac Productions). (Batjac Productions)

I thank Walter Carr very much for his letter, “Problem with ‘Wokeness’: There’s not enough of it” (Nov. 19). The headline makes his point.

Meanwhile, the thrust of the article, “New laws bring chills to classrooms” (Nov. 20) was that assorted school districts want nothing to do with the issue of white supremacy. A district in Tennessee removed Frederick Douglass’ autobiography from its reading lists. A teacher in that state was fired for failure to present a conservative perspective of white privilege. It is beyond sad that certain school districts refuse to accept that white supremacy is part of this country’s history.

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Kyle Rittenhouse came to Kenosha, Wisconsin, with an illegal weapon that he used to kill two people and severely wound another. He testified that he wanted an AR-15-style rifle because it was “cool.” It was not a surprise when a jury found him not guilty of all charges.

Mr. Carr astutely made this observation: “Far too many white people prefer their history gift-wrapped and sanitized.” John Wayne, no historian, starred in and directed “The Alamo.” He failed to inform moviegoers that Mexico had ended slavery and that Davy Crockett and the other defenders were there to preserve slavery in the Republic of Texas. In John Ford’s classic Western, “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance,” a newspaper editor made another astute observation: “When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”

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Max Obuszewski, Baltimore

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