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Don’t use the term, ‘white privilege’ | READER COMMENTARY

Mark McCloskey, 63, and his 61-year-old wife, Patricia, stand outside their home holding guns including a semi-automatic rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters who were marching toward the residence of St Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson on June 28, 2020 in St Louis, Missouri. Were they exercising constitutional rights, or recklessly asserting their white privilege? File.
Mark McCloskey, 63, and his 61-year-old wife, Patricia, stand outside their home holding guns including a semi-automatic rifle at Black Lives Matter protesters who were marching toward the residence of St Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson on June 28, 2020 in St Louis, Missouri. Were they exercising constitutional rights, or recklessly asserting their white privilege? File. (AFP/Getty Images)

Using the term, “white privilege,” may be politically counter-productive (“When white privilege collides with squeegee kids,” Sept. 16). If we continue to use this phrase, we can be setting ourselves up for greater racial divide. This is a new term that we can all do without.

Consider people of all races standing on food lines, people who can’t pay their rent, tuition or medical bills. Consider people of all races who are suffering from the ravages of fire, storms and global warming. Consider people of all races who elect people of all races, some of whom are inept and others who are extremely effective in managing and making our lives better.

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The term, “white privilege,” is a hard sell to white people who are suffering and those who are not but are necessary political allies for a better future for all of us.

Marcia Kargon, Baltimore

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